Ethel Wilson and sophistication

Faye Hammill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Critics often use the term “sophisticated” to describe the fiction of Ethel Wilson. Though it is difficult to capture the full range of the word’s connotation, sophistication in Ethel Wilson’s work is embodied by three features: experience, complexity, and elegance. Wilson’s narratives construct hierarchies of sophistication and often juxtapose sophistication of narrative with that of subject, making novels like Hetty Dorval (1947), Swamp Angel (1954), and Love and Salt Water (1956), as well as Wilson’s short stories, fertile ground for examining sophistication as both theme and technique. Hetty Dorval centres on themes of innocence and experience, and presents sophistication as unshockability or unawareness of conventional moral standards on the part of Mrs. Dorval, while Frankie becomes more shockable as she becomes more experienced. In Love and Salt Water, straightforward and sparse prose yields exceedingly complex impressions. In the context of mid-twentieth-century Canadian literature, Wilson’s cosmopolitan detachment, as opposed to her compatriots’ earnestness and national commitment, sets her work apart.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-75
Number of pages22
JournalStudies in Canadian Literature
Volume36
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Keywords

  • ethel wilson
  • sophistication

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