Enzymatic acylation of starch

Apostolos Alissandratos, Peter Halling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described.
LanguageUndefined/Unknown
JournalBioresource Technology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2012

Keywords

  • starch ester
  • polysaccharide
  • enzymatic acylation

Cite this

@article{6f862b5ca8374fa3a7025574da4fa5b9,
title = "Enzymatic acylation of starch",
abstract = "Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described.",
keywords = "starch ester, polysaccharide, enzymatic acylation",
author = "Apostolos Alissandratos and Peter Halling",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.biortech.2011.11.030",
language = "Undefined/Unknown",
journal = "Bioresource Technology",
issn = "0960-8524",

}

Enzymatic acylation of starch. / Alissandratos, Apostolos; Halling, Peter.

In: Bioresource Technology, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enzymatic acylation of starch

AU - Alissandratos, Apostolos

AU - Halling, Peter

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described.

AB - Starch a cheap, abundant and renewable natural material has been chemically modified for many years. The popular modification acylation has been used to adjust rheological properties as well as deliver polymers with internal plasticizers and other potential uses. However the harsh reaction conditions required to produce these esters may limit their use, especially in sensitive applications (foods, pharmaceuticals, etc.). The use of enzymes to catalyse acylation may provide a suitable alternative due to high selectivities and mild reaction conditions. Traditional hydrolase-catalysed synthesis in non-aqueous apolar media is hard due to lack of polysaccharide solubility. However, acylated starch derivatives have recently been successfully produced in other non-conventional systems: (a) surfactant-solubilised subtilisin and suspended amylose in organic media; (b) starch nanoparticles dispersed in organic medium with immobilised lipase; (c) aqueous starch gels with lipase and dispersed fatty acids. We attempt a systematic review that draws parallels between the seemingly unrelated approaches described.

KW - starch ester

KW - polysaccharide

KW - enzymatic acylation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861460920&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.biortech.2011.11.030

DO - 10.1016/j.biortech.2011.11.030

M3 - Article

JO - Bioresource Technology

T2 - Bioresource Technology

JF - Bioresource Technology

SN - 0960-8524

ER -