Entering Norwegian treatment collectives: a study of youths' first impressions and experiences

Arvid Lone, Erik Paulsen

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Abstract

This study focused on the pre-admission and admission phases of residential
treatment, assuming that these phases are important for the motivation for
treatment and for the kinds of relationships that are established in treatment.
Nineteen youths living in two Norwegian treatment collectives were interviewed
regarding their first contacts with the collective, their admission and their first
weeks of treatment. Most of the youths came to treatment as involuntary
clients. Our findings showed that most of the youths appraised pre-admission
contacts positively. In addition, the youths described the admission phase as a
period of fear and great uncertainty during which they were worried about life at
the collective and their new peers in the institution. The youths reported that the
primary task for the first period of treatment was to make a connection and
establish a relationship with someone. In this situation, the youths seemed to
prefer to establish relationships with their peers. This study is focused on the
pre-admission and admission phases of residential treatment, assuming that
these phases are important for the motivation for treatment and for the kinds of
relationships that are established in treatment.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages16
JournalScottish Journal of Residential Child Care
Volume16
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 13 Apr 2017

Keywords

  • residential care
  • treatment collectives
  • admission phase
  • user perspectives

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