Enhancing ultraviolet spontaneous emission with a designed quantum vacuum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We determine how to alter the properties of the quantum vacuum at ultraviolet
wavelengths to simultaneously enhance the spontaneous transition rates and the far field detection rate of quantum emitters. We find the response of several complex nanostructures in the 200 − 400 nm range, where many organic molecules have fluorescent responses, using an analytic decomposition of the electromagnetic response in terms of continuous spectra of plane waves and discrete sets of modes. Coupling a nanorod with an aluminum substrate gives decay rates up to 2.7 × 103 times larger than the decay rate in vacuum and enhancements of 824 for the far field emission into the entire upper semi-space and of 2.04 × 103 for emission within a cone with a 60º semi-angle. This effect is due to both an enhancement of the field at the emitter’s position and a reshaping of the radiation patterns near mode resonances and cannot be obtained by replacing the aluminum substrate with a second nanoparticle or with a fused silica substrate. These large decay rates and far field enhancement factors will be very useful in the detection of fluorescence signals, as these resonances can be shifted by changing the dimensions of th nanorod. Moreover, these nanostructures have potential for nano-lasing because the Q factors of these resonances can reach 107.9, higher than the Q factors observed in nano-lasers.
LanguageEnglish
Pages4162-4179
Number of pages18
JournalOptics Express
Volume25
Issue number4
Early online date15 Feb 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Feb 2017

Fingerprint

ultraviolet emission
spontaneous emission
decay rates
far fields
vacuum
nanorods
augmentation
Q factors
emitters
aluminum
continuous spectra
lasing
field emission
cones
plane waves
electromagnetism
silicon dioxide
decomposition
fluorescence
nanoparticles

Keywords

  • subwavelength structures
  • ultraviolet
  • fluorescence
  • fluctuations, relaxations, and noise

Cite this

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title = "Enhancing ultraviolet spontaneous emission with a designed quantum vacuum",
abstract = "We determine how to alter the properties of the quantum vacuum at ultravioletwavelengths to simultaneously enhance the spontaneous transition rates and the far field detection rate of quantum emitters. We find the response of several complex nanostructures in the 200 − 400 nm range, where many organic molecules have fluorescent responses, using an analytic decomposition of the electromagnetic response in terms of continuous spectra of plane waves and discrete sets of modes. Coupling a nanorod with an aluminum substrate gives decay rates up to 2.7 × 103 times larger than the decay rate in vacuum and enhancements of 824 for the far field emission into the entire upper semi-space and of 2.04 × 103 for emission within a cone with a 60º semi-angle. This effect is due to both an enhancement of the field at the emitter’s position and a reshaping of the radiation patterns near mode resonances and cannot be obtained by replacing the aluminum substrate with a second nanoparticle or with a fused silica substrate. These large decay rates and far field enhancement factors will be very useful in the detection of fluorescence signals, as these resonances can be shifted by changing the dimensions of th nanorod. Moreover, these nanostructures have potential for nano-lasing because the Q factors of these resonances can reach 107.9, higher than the Q factors observed in nano-lasers.",
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Enhancing ultraviolet spontaneous emission with a designed quantum vacuum. / McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Benjamin; Papoff, Francesco.

In: Optics Express, Vol. 25, No. 4, 20.02.2017, p. 4162-4179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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