Enhanced attachment of acanthamoeba to extended-wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses: a new risk factor for infection?

T.K. Beattie, A. Tomlinson, A. McFadyen, D. Seal, A.M. Grimason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acanthamoebal attachment to the S-H lenses was significantly greater than to the conventional hydrogel. Liquid-cultured trophozoites demonstrated a higher affinity for the lenses tested. Wear and bacterial biofilm coating had no effect on attachment to S-H lenses. The increased attachment found with the S-H lens may be an inherent characteristic of the polymer or a side effect of the surface treatment procedure to which the lenses are exposed. It is possible that S-H lenses are at greater risk of promoting Acanthamoeba infection if exposed to the organism because of the enhanced attachment characteristic of this new material.
LanguageEnglish
Pages765-771
Number of pages6
JournalBMC Ophthalmology
Volume110
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Acanthamoeba
Hydrogel
Contact Lenses
Silicones
Lenses
Infection
Trophozoites
Biofilms
Polymers

Keywords

  • microbiology
  • contact lens
  • ophthalmology
  • acanthamoeba

Cite this

Beattie, T.K. ; Tomlinson, A. ; McFadyen, A. ; Seal, D. ; Grimason, A.M. / Enhanced attachment of acanthamoeba to extended-wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses: a new risk factor for infection?. In: BMC Ophthalmology. 2003 ; Vol. 110, No. 4. pp. 765-771.
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Enhanced attachment of acanthamoeba to extended-wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses: a new risk factor for infection? / Beattie, T.K.; Tomlinson, A.; McFadyen, A.; Seal, D.; Grimason, A.M.

In: BMC Ophthalmology, Vol. 110, No. 4, 2003, p. 765-771.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enhanced attachment of acanthamoeba to extended-wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses: a new risk factor for infection?

AU - Beattie, T.K.

AU - Tomlinson, A.

AU - McFadyen, A.

AU - Seal, D.

AU - Grimason, A.M.

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

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AB - Acanthamoebal attachment to the S-H lenses was significantly greater than to the conventional hydrogel. Liquid-cultured trophozoites demonstrated a higher affinity for the lenses tested. Wear and bacterial biofilm coating had no effect on attachment to S-H lenses. The increased attachment found with the S-H lens may be an inherent characteristic of the polymer or a side effect of the surface treatment procedure to which the lenses are exposed. It is possible that S-H lenses are at greater risk of promoting Acanthamoeba infection if exposed to the organism because of the enhanced attachment characteristic of this new material.

KW - microbiology

KW - contact lens

KW - ophthalmology

KW - acanthamoeba

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0161-6420(02)01971-1

U2 - 10.1016/S0161-6420(02)01971-1

DO - 10.1016/S0161-6420(02)01971-1

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VL - 110

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EP - 771

JO - BMC Ophthalmology

T2 - BMC Ophthalmology

JF - BMC Ophthalmology

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