Electronics: a 'culture' of participation?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter analyses the issue of employee representation, using a detailed survey of electronics companies in Scotland. The high proportion of foreign-owned multinational companies in the industry in Scotland, many of which are American-owned blue chip multinationals, is likely to have had significant impact on industrial relations policies and procedures. However, on closer inspection, very few companies claimed to have any guidelines from their parent company relating to the general sphere of employee participation and involvement schemes. Further, within these companies, managers argued that the influence of the parent company was felt more in terms of a general company culture or set of values rather than in terms of any guidelines or directives on specific schemes. The companies were asked an open question on how much information they gave to their employees on company affairs. Non-unionism appears to be the result of a particular corporate philosophy of non-interference by outside agencies, emanating most directly from medium and large US companies.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInformation Technology and Workplace Democracy
EditorsMartin Beirne, Harvey Ramsay
Place of PublicationOxon
Chapter2
Pages56-91
Number of pages36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Mar 2018
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • employee representation
  • Scotland
  • survey
  • industrial relations

Cite this

Findlay, P. (2018). Electronics: a 'culture' of participation? In M. Beirne, & H. Ramsay (Eds.), Information Technology and Workplace Democracy (pp. 56-91). Oxon. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203701515