Electromagnetic navigated versus conventional total knee arthroplasty—a five-year follow-up of a single-blind randomized control trial

Andrew N. Clark, Adam Hounat, Sinead O'Donnell, Pauline May, James Doonan, Philip Rowe, Bryn G. Jones, Mark J.G. Blyth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study is to provide the 5-year follow-up results of a randomized study comparing conventional versus electromagnetic computer navigated total knee arthroplasty. Methods: Analysis of 127 patients (66 navigated and 61 conventional surgeries) was performed from a prospective, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Patient-reported outcome measures were collected at 5 years after surgery and compared with previously published 1-year clinical outcomes. Five-year surgical revision rates were collated and compared between intervention groups. Results: Overall, there have been continued improvements in the clinical scores of patients in both groups when compared with clinical data at 1 year; however, at 5 years, there is no statistical difference in any of the patient-reported outcome measures between conventional and navigated surgery. Interestingly, improved implant survivorship was observed in the navigated (0% revision rate) compared with the conventional group (4.9% all-cause revision rate). Conclusion: Electromagnetic computer navigated technology produces similar clinical outcomes compared with traditional surgery. Further work is required to monitor implant survivorship, and clinical outcomes with long-term follow-up, to determine the cost effectiveness of this technology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3451-3455
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume36
Issue number10
Early online date12 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • clinical follow-up
  • EM navigation
  • implant survivorship
  • randomized controlled trial
  • total knee arthroplasty

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