Elections as beauty contests: do the rules matter?

John Curtice, S. Hunjan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Leaders have become the human face of election campaigns. This has lead to the
suggestion that many voters now vote for the party leader they like best rather than the party they prefer. However, people would seem more likely to vote for the leader rather than the party in presidential elections rather than parliamentary ones, and amongst parliamentary elections themselves when a majoritarian rather than proportional electoral system is used. In addition we might expect these propositions to be particularly true if few people have a strong party identification and many people watch a lot of television news. This paper uses the Comparative Study of Electoral Systems project data to assess whether there is any systematic evidence to support these expectations.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationPolitical Leaders and Democratic Elections
EditorsK. Aarts, A. Blais, H. Schmitt
Place of PublicationOxford
Number of pages20
Publication statusPublished - 10 Mar 2011

Fingerprint

beauty
election
electoral system
leader
voter
election campaign
parliamentary election
presidential election
television
news
evidence

Keywords

  • electoral system
  • elections
  • parliament
  • election campaigns

Cite this

Curtice, J., & Hunjan, S. (2011). Elections as beauty contests: do the rules matter? In K. Aarts, A. Blais, & H. Schmitt (Eds.), Political Leaders and Democratic Elections Oxford.
Curtice, John ; Hunjan, S. / Elections as beauty contests: do the rules matter?. Political Leaders and Democratic Elections. editor / K. Aarts ; A. Blais ; H. Schmitt. Oxford, 2011.
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Curtice, J & Hunjan, S 2011, Elections as beauty contests: do the rules matter? in K Aarts, A Blais & H Schmitt (eds), Political Leaders and Democratic Elections. Oxford.

Elections as beauty contests: do the rules matter? / Curtice, John; Hunjan, S.

Political Leaders and Democratic Elections. ed. / K. Aarts; A. Blais; H. Schmitt. Oxford, 2011.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Curtice J, Hunjan S. Elections as beauty contests: do the rules matter? In Aarts K, Blais A, Schmitt H, editors, Political Leaders and Democratic Elections. Oxford. 2011