Effects of group norms on children's intentions to bully

D. Nesdale, K. Durkin, A. Maass, J. Kiesner, J.A. Griffiths

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A minimal group study examined the effect of peer group norms on children's direct and indirect bullying intentions. Prior to an inter-group drawing competition, children (N = 85) aged seven and nine years were assigned to a group that had a norm of out-group dislike or out-group liking. Results indicated that, regardless of group norms, the children's attitudes were more positive towards the in-group vs. the out-group. Children's bullying intentions were greater when the in-group had a norm of out-group dislike vs. out-group liking, the children were younger rather than older, and the bullying was indirect vs. direct. A three-way interaction showed that the in-group norms had a larger effect on the younger children's direct rather than indirect bullying intentions, but a larger effect on the older children's indirect rather than direct bullying intentions. Implications for understanding school bullying intentions and behaviour are discussed.
LanguageEnglish
Pages889-907
Number of pages18
JournalSocial Development
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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group norm
Bullying
outgroup
exclusion
Group
Peer Group
peer group
study group
interaction

Keywords

  • group norms
  • bullying
  • children
  • identity

Cite this

Nesdale, D. ; Durkin, K. ; Maass, A. ; Kiesner, J. ; Griffiths, J.A. / Effects of group norms on children's intentions to bully. In: Social Development. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 889-907.
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Nesdale, D, Durkin, K, Maass, A, Kiesner, J & Griffiths, JA 2008, 'Effects of group norms on children's intentions to bully' Social Development, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 889-907. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2008.00475.x

Effects of group norms on children's intentions to bully. / Nesdale, D.; Durkin, K.; Maass, A.; Kiesner, J.; Griffiths, J.A.

In: Social Development, Vol. 17, No. 4, 2008, p. 889-907.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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