Effect of muscle temperature on rate of oxygen uptake during exercise in humans at different contraction frequencies

R.A. Ferguson, D. Ball, A.J. Sargeant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 % of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 60revs min(-1). Muscle temperature was passively elevated prior to exercise by immersion of the legs in a hot water bath (42degreesC). During exercise at this low pedalling rate, total energy turnover was higher (P<0.05) when muscle temperature was elevated compared with normal temperature (70.4+/-3.7 versus 66.9+/-2.4kJ min(-1), respectively). Estimated net mechanical efficiency was found to be lower when muscle temperature was elevated. A second experiment was conducted in which the effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 % of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 120 revs min(-1). Under the conditions of a high pedalling frequency, an elevated muscle temperature resulted in a lower energy turnover (P<0.05) compared with the normal muscle temperature (64.9 +/- 3.7 versus 69.0 +/- 4.7 kJmin(-1), respectively). The estimated net mechanical efficiency was therefore higher when muscle temperature was elevated. We propose that, in these experiments, prior heating results in an inappropriately fast rate of cross-bridge cycling when exercising at 60 revs min(-1), leading to an increased energy turnover and decreased efficiency.; However, at the faster pedalling rate, the effect of heating the muscle shifts the efficiency/velocity relationship to the right so that crossbridge detachment is more appropriately matched to the contraction velocity and, hence, energy turnover is reduced.
LanguageEnglish
Pages981-987
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Biology
Volume205
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2002

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contraction
muscle
exercise
Oxygen
oxygen
Muscles
muscles
Temperature
turnover
temperature
energy
Foot
Heating
heating
heat
effect
rate
Immersion
Baths
Leg

Keywords

  • contraction velocity
  • temperature
  • cycling exercise
  • efficiency/velocity relationship

Cite this

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title = "Effect of muscle temperature on rate of oxygen uptake during exercise in humans at different contraction frequencies",
abstract = "The effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 {\%} of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 60revs min(-1). Muscle temperature was passively elevated prior to exercise by immersion of the legs in a hot water bath (42degreesC). During exercise at this low pedalling rate, total energy turnover was higher (P<0.05) when muscle temperature was elevated compared with normal temperature (70.4+/-3.7 versus 66.9+/-2.4kJ min(-1), respectively). Estimated net mechanical efficiency was found to be lower when muscle temperature was elevated. A second experiment was conducted in which the effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 {\%} of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 120 revs min(-1). Under the conditions of a high pedalling frequency, an elevated muscle temperature resulted in a lower energy turnover (P<0.05) compared with the normal muscle temperature (64.9 +/- 3.7 versus 69.0 +/- 4.7 kJmin(-1), respectively). The estimated net mechanical efficiency was therefore higher when muscle temperature was elevated. We propose that, in these experiments, prior heating results in an inappropriately fast rate of cross-bridge cycling when exercising at 60 revs min(-1), leading to an increased energy turnover and decreased efficiency.; However, at the faster pedalling rate, the effect of heating the muscle shifts the efficiency/velocity relationship to the right so that crossbridge detachment is more appropriately matched to the contraction velocity and, hence, energy turnover is reduced.",
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Effect of muscle temperature on rate of oxygen uptake during exercise in humans at different contraction frequencies. / Ferguson, R.A.; Ball, D.; Sargeant, A.J.

In: Journal of Experimental Biology, Vol. 205, No. 7, 04.2002, p. 981-987.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Ferguson, R.A.

AU - Ball, D.

AU - Sargeant, A.J.

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N2 - The effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 % of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 60revs min(-1). Muscle temperature was passively elevated prior to exercise by immersion of the legs in a hot water bath (42degreesC). During exercise at this low pedalling rate, total energy turnover was higher (P<0.05) when muscle temperature was elevated compared with normal temperature (70.4+/-3.7 versus 66.9+/-2.4kJ min(-1), respectively). Estimated net mechanical efficiency was found to be lower when muscle temperature was elevated. A second experiment was conducted in which the effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 % of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 120 revs min(-1). Under the conditions of a high pedalling frequency, an elevated muscle temperature resulted in a lower energy turnover (P<0.05) compared with the normal muscle temperature (64.9 +/- 3.7 versus 69.0 +/- 4.7 kJmin(-1), respectively). The estimated net mechanical efficiency was therefore higher when muscle temperature was elevated. We propose that, in these experiments, prior heating results in an inappropriately fast rate of cross-bridge cycling when exercising at 60 revs min(-1), leading to an increased energy turnover and decreased efficiency.; However, at the faster pedalling rate, the effect of heating the muscle shifts the efficiency/velocity relationship to the right so that crossbridge detachment is more appropriately matched to the contraction velocity and, hence, energy turnover is reduced.

AB - The effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 % of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 60revs min(-1). Muscle temperature was passively elevated prior to exercise by immersion of the legs in a hot water bath (42degreesC). During exercise at this low pedalling rate, total energy turnover was higher (P<0.05) when muscle temperature was elevated compared with normal temperature (70.4+/-3.7 versus 66.9+/-2.4kJ min(-1), respectively). Estimated net mechanical efficiency was found to be lower when muscle temperature was elevated. A second experiment was conducted in which the effect of elevated human muscle temperature on energy turnover was investigated during cycling exercise (at 85 % of V-O2max) at a contraction frequency of 120 revs min(-1). Under the conditions of a high pedalling frequency, an elevated muscle temperature resulted in a lower energy turnover (P<0.05) compared with the normal muscle temperature (64.9 +/- 3.7 versus 69.0 +/- 4.7 kJmin(-1), respectively). The estimated net mechanical efficiency was therefore higher when muscle temperature was elevated. We propose that, in these experiments, prior heating results in an inappropriately fast rate of cross-bridge cycling when exercising at 60 revs min(-1), leading to an increased energy turnover and decreased efficiency.; However, at the faster pedalling rate, the effect of heating the muscle shifts the efficiency/velocity relationship to the right so that crossbridge detachment is more appropriately matched to the contraction velocity and, hence, energy turnover is reduced.

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