Educational administration challenges in the destabilised and distintegrating states of Syria and Yemen: the intersectionality of violence, culture, ideology, class/status group and postcoloniality

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter examines internationalising the educational administration field to include the conditions under which schools operate in conflict zone countries. To achieve this, a new type of intersectionality theory is proposed that includes the factors of 'collapsed' or 'disintegrating' states like Syria and Yemen experiencing extreme violence and humanitarian crises. This includes the following aspects of these under represented populations: 1) conditions in that are extreme and life-threatening where trauma is systemic and access to resources and infrastructure is limited or no longer exists; 2) proposing an intersectionality theory that consists of extreme violence and human rights violations; and 3) relevant recommendations and guidelines developed for education by the UN and NGOs involving difficulties of reconstruction after sufficient peace is established.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNeoliberalism and Education Systems in Conflict
Subtitle of host publicationExploring Challenges Across the Globe
EditorsKhalid Arar, Deniz Orucu, Jane Wilkinson
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter10
Pages135-150
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780429345135
ISBN (Print)9780367362935, 9780367352554
Publication statusPublished - 30 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • education in Syria
  • education in Yemen
  • educational administration

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