Don't take the high road: tartanry and its critics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

An historically and critically sound - and contemporary - evaluation of tartan and tartanry based on proper contextualisation and coherent analysis. This critical re-evaluation of one of the more controversial aspects of recent debates on Scottish culture draws together contributions from leading researchers in a wide variety of disciplines, resulting in a highly accessible yet authoritative volume. This book, like tartan, weaves together two strands. The first, like a warp, considers the significance of tartan in Scottish history and culture during the last four centuries, including tartan's role in the development of diaspora identities in North America. The second, like a weft, considers the place of tartan and rise of tartanry in the national and international representations of Scottishness, including heritage, historical myth-making, popular culture, music hall, literature, film, comedy, rock and pop music, sport and 'high' culture. From Tartan to Tartanry offers fresh insight into and new perspectives on key cultural phenomena, from the iconic role of the Scottish regiments to the role of tartan in rock music. It argues that tartan may be fun, but it also plays a wide range of fascinating, important and valuable roles in Scottish and international culture.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrom tartan to tartanry
Subtitle of host publicationScottish culture, history and myth
EditorsIan Brown
Place of PublicationEdinburgh
PublisherEdinburgh University Press
Pages232-245
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9780748638772
Publication statusPublished - 26 Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Roads
Tartan
Scottish Culture
Evaluation
Fun
High Culture
Rock
Weave
Comedy
Diaspora
Rise
Rock music
Scottish History
Heritage
Contextualization
Music Hall
Pop Music
Cultural Phenomena
Iconic
Historical Myths

Keywords

  • Scottish literature
  • culture
  • tartan

Cite this

Goldie, D. (2010). Don't take the high road: tartanry and its critics. In I. Brown (Ed.), From tartan to tartanry: Scottish culture, history and myth (pp. 232-245). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Goldie, David. / Don't take the high road : tartanry and its critics. From tartan to tartanry: Scottish culture, history and myth. editor / Ian Brown. Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2010. pp. 232-245
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Goldie, D 2010, Don't take the high road: tartanry and its critics. in I Brown (ed.), From tartan to tartanry: Scottish culture, history and myth. Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, pp. 232-245.

Don't take the high road : tartanry and its critics. / Goldie, David.

From tartan to tartanry: Scottish culture, history and myth. ed. / Ian Brown. Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, 2010. p. 232-245.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Goldie D. Don't take the high road: tartanry and its critics. In Brown I, editor, From tartan to tartanry: Scottish culture, history and myth. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 2010. p. 232-245