Does monitoring newborn weight discourage breastfeeding?

A. McKie, D. Young, P.D. Macdonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A policy of regular neonatal weight monitoring was introduced to a geographically defined population in 2000. This was combined with targeted breast feeding support for infants reaching specified intervention thresholds. Aims: To look for evidence of compromise in breast feeding rates as a result of this policy change. Methods: Breast feeding rates at 10 days and 6 weeks were compared for this intervention population and two local non-intervention groups for the years 1999 and 2001. The data were analysed using Poisson regression analysis and the Z-test. Results: There was a 3.1% (95% CI 0.8% to 5.5%) rise in the deprivation corrected breast feeding rate at 6 weeks for the intervention population compared to an increase of 0.8% (95% CI -0.8% to 2.3%) for the combined control groups. Multivariate analysis showed that breast feeding rates were adversely influenced by deprivation, but were not significantly influenced by the intervention. Conclusion: No evidence was found to support claims that regular monitoring of newborn weight adversely affects breast feeding rates.
LanguageEnglish
Pages44-46
Number of pages2
JournalArchives of Disease in Childhood
Volume91
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Oct 2005

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Breast Feeding
Newborn Infant
Weights and Measures
Population
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Control Groups

Keywords

  • breast feeding
  • weight monitoring
  • newborn

Cite this

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title = "Does monitoring newborn weight discourage breastfeeding?",
abstract = "Background: A policy of regular neonatal weight monitoring was introduced to a geographically defined population in 2000. This was combined with targeted breast feeding support for infants reaching specified intervention thresholds. Aims: To look for evidence of compromise in breast feeding rates as a result of this policy change. Methods: Breast feeding rates at 10 days and 6 weeks were compared for this intervention population and two local non-intervention groups for the years 1999 and 2001. The data were analysed using Poisson regression analysis and the Z-test. Results: There was a 3.1{\%} (95{\%} CI 0.8{\%} to 5.5{\%}) rise in the deprivation corrected breast feeding rate at 6 weeks for the intervention population compared to an increase of 0.8{\%} (95{\%} CI -0.8{\%} to 2.3{\%}) for the combined control groups. Multivariate analysis showed that breast feeding rates were adversely influenced by deprivation, but were not significantly influenced by the intervention. Conclusion: No evidence was found to support claims that regular monitoring of newborn weight adversely affects breast feeding rates.",
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Does monitoring newborn weight discourage breastfeeding? / McKie, A.; Young, D.; Macdonald, P.D.

In: Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol. 91, 20.10.2005, p. 44-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does monitoring newborn weight discourage breastfeeding?

AU - McKie, A.

AU - Young, D.

AU - Macdonald, P.D.

PY - 2005/10/20

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