Documenting young children’s technology use

observations in the home

Lisa M. Given, Denise C. Winkler, Rebekah Willson, Christina Davidson, Susan Danby, Karen Thorpe

Research output: Contribution to journalConference Contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While there has been much interest in children's use of different technologies, research is often done with school-age children in their classrooms. This exploratory research study looks at fifteen preschool children (aged three to five) in Queensland, Australia and their use of different technologies in their own homes. This paper examines data from a checklist of technologies available in the home and video recording data of children's interactions with online technologies and other people captured by parents, which were analyzed using a modified ‘seating sweeps’ (Given & Leckie 2003) approach to gain a detailed, descriptive analysis of the home environment. A range of technologies are available to children, with the television and DVD player being most common in the home. Unlike desktop and laptop computers, which were restricted to adult use in half of homes, mobile computing devices (e.g., tablets and smartphones) were quite prevalent and generally available for children's use. In almost all cases children used devices designed for adults and often used them in common spaces in the home, such as the home office (38%) or living room (36%). Many children (45%) engaged independently with technology, able to accomplish activities and learn on their own. This study contributes to a growing body of literature about how young children connect to technology and the growing digital world around them. Examining children's interaction with technology and in the home environment allows researchers to better understand the role of technology in children's lives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology
Volume51
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2015
EventAnnual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology - Seattle, United States
Duration: 31 Oct 20145 Nov 2014
Conference number: 77

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Laptop computers
Video recording
Videodisks
Mobile computing
DVD
Smartphones
video recording
Television
Personal computers
interaction
preschool child
television
parents
classroom
school

Keywords

  • preschool children
  • technology use
  • home environment
  • observational research

Cite this

Given, Lisa M. ; Winkler, Denise C. ; Willson, Rebekah ; Davidson, Christina ; Danby, Susan ; Thorpe, Karen. / Documenting young children’s technology use : observations in the home. In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology. 2015 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 1-9.
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Documenting young children’s technology use : observations in the home. / Given, Lisa M.; Winkler, Denise C.; Willson, Rebekah; Davidson, Christina; Danby, Susan; Thorpe, Karen.

In: Proceedings of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Vol. 51, No. 1, 24.04.2015, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference Contribution

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AU - Winkler, Denise C.

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