Doctor competence and the demand for healthcare: evidence from rural China

Eduardo Fe, Timothy Powell-Jackson, Winnie Yip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The agency problem between patients and doctors has long been emphasised in the health economics literature, but the empirical evidence on whether patients can evaluate and respond to better quality care remains mixed and inconclusive. Using household data linked to an assessment of village doctors' clinical competence in rural China, we show that there is no correlation between doctor competence and patients' healthcare utilisation, with confidence intervals reasonably tight around zero. Household perceptions of quality are an important determinant of care seeking behaviour yet patients appear unable to recognise more competent doctors -there is no relationship between doctor competence and perceptions of quality.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1177-1190
Number of pages24
JournalHealth Economics
Volume26
Issue number10
Early online date15 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2017

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Mental Competency
China
Delivery of Health Care
demand
evidence
Clinical Competence
Quality of Health Care
village
confidence
utilization
determinants
Economics
Confidence Intervals
health
economics
Health
literature

Keywords

  • doctor competence,
  • quality of care
  • perceptions
  • item response theory

Cite this

Fe, Eduardo ; Powell-Jackson, Timothy ; Yip, Winnie. / Doctor competence and the demand for healthcare : evidence from rural China. In: Health Economics. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 10. pp. 1177-1190.
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Doctor competence and the demand for healthcare : evidence from rural China. / Fe, Eduardo; Powell-Jackson, Timothy; Yip, Winnie.

In: Health Economics, Vol. 26, No. 10, 31.10.2017, p. 1177-1190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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