Do environmental regulations affect the location decisions of multinational gold mining firms?

Lise Tole, Gary Koop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article empirically analyzes the regional location decisions of the world's; major gold mining firms using a dataset of political, economic, regulatory, infrastructural and investment risk variables observed since 1975. The aim is to determine whether environmental stringency affects regional location decisions after controlling for other potentially important variables that may affect such decisions. Empirical results suggest that gold mining firms are strongly attracted to regions that are close to their head office and have low levels of corruption. They also have some preference for regions which provide a low risk, secure, transparent and stable environment for doing business. Gold mining firms also appear to be attracted to regions that have a clean environment, although evidence is less uniformly robust. However, most important key question of this study is that is there no evidence for pollution haven activity among the world's; industrial gold mining firms?
LanguageEnglish
Pages151-177
Number of pages27
JournalJournal of Economic Geography
Volume11
Issue number1
Early online date2 Feb 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

location decision
gold
firm
regulation
corruption
evidence
pollution
Gold mining
Multinationals
Environmental regulation
Location decision
economics
world

Keywords

  • multinational plant location decisions
  • pollution havens
  • environmental stringency
  • gold mining industry

Cite this

@article{2786ee919e764794bfe24f3e356660eb,
title = "Do environmental regulations affect the location decisions of multinational gold mining firms?",
abstract = "This article empirically analyzes the regional location decisions of the world's; major gold mining firms using a dataset of political, economic, regulatory, infrastructural and investment risk variables observed since 1975. The aim is to determine whether environmental stringency affects regional location decisions after controlling for other potentially important variables that may affect such decisions. Empirical results suggest that gold mining firms are strongly attracted to regions that are close to their head office and have low levels of corruption. They also have some preference for regions which provide a low risk, secure, transparent and stable environment for doing business. Gold mining firms also appear to be attracted to regions that have a clean environment, although evidence is less uniformly robust. However, most important key question of this study is that is there no evidence for pollution haven activity among the world's; industrial gold mining firms?",
keywords = "multinational plant location decisions, pollution havens, environmental stringency, gold mining industry",
author = "Lise Tole and Gary Koop",
note = "Non-duplicate: 7737",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1093/jeg/lbp064",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "151--177",
journal = "Journal of Economic Geography",
issn = "1468-2702",
number = "1",

}

Do environmental regulations affect the location decisions of multinational gold mining firms? / Tole, Lise; Koop, Gary.

In: Journal of Economic Geography, Vol. 11, No. 1, 2011, p. 151-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do environmental regulations affect the location decisions of multinational gold mining firms?

AU - Tole, Lise

AU - Koop, Gary

N1 - Non-duplicate: 7737

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - This article empirically analyzes the regional location decisions of the world's; major gold mining firms using a dataset of political, economic, regulatory, infrastructural and investment risk variables observed since 1975. The aim is to determine whether environmental stringency affects regional location decisions after controlling for other potentially important variables that may affect such decisions. Empirical results suggest that gold mining firms are strongly attracted to regions that are close to their head office and have low levels of corruption. They also have some preference for regions which provide a low risk, secure, transparent and stable environment for doing business. Gold mining firms also appear to be attracted to regions that have a clean environment, although evidence is less uniformly robust. However, most important key question of this study is that is there no evidence for pollution haven activity among the world's; industrial gold mining firms?

AB - This article empirically analyzes the regional location decisions of the world's; major gold mining firms using a dataset of political, economic, regulatory, infrastructural and investment risk variables observed since 1975. The aim is to determine whether environmental stringency affects regional location decisions after controlling for other potentially important variables that may affect such decisions. Empirical results suggest that gold mining firms are strongly attracted to regions that are close to their head office and have low levels of corruption. They also have some preference for regions which provide a low risk, secure, transparent and stable environment for doing business. Gold mining firms also appear to be attracted to regions that have a clean environment, although evidence is less uniformly robust. However, most important key question of this study is that is there no evidence for pollution haven activity among the world's; industrial gold mining firms?

KW - multinational plant location decisions

KW - pollution havens

KW - environmental stringency

KW - gold mining industry

UR - http://strathprints.strath.ac.uk/7737/

U2 - 10.1093/jeg/lbp064

DO - 10.1093/jeg/lbp064

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 151

EP - 177

JO - Journal of Economic Geography

T2 - Journal of Economic Geography

JF - Journal of Economic Geography

SN - 1468-2702

IS - 1

ER -