Distributed crystal fiber sensing for extreme environments

Craig J. Dalzell, Thomas P. J. Han, Ivan S. Ruddock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Distributed sensing of temperature can be achieved by using time-correlated two-photon excited fluorescence (TPF). To assess the extension of this technique to single-crystal fibers for high-temperature applications, various aspects are considered including the two-photon absorption cross-section (delta), dopant density, and the geometry of single crystal fibers. By comparing the fluorescence yield for two-photon excitation with that for single-photon excitation of the same transition, delta for ruby was measured over the 0.8-1.2 mu m range with maximum room temperature values of 5.9 x 10(-3) GM for e-polarization and 4.6 x 10(-3) GM for o-polarization at 840 nm. It is shown that values of this magnitude are adequate for a practical TPF-based crystal fiber sensor to be realized.

LanguageEnglish
Pages164-167
Number of pages4
JournalIEEE Sensors Journal
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Photons
Crystals
fibers
Fibers
photons
Fluorescence
crystals
fluorescence
Single crystals
Polarization
Ruby
High temperature applications
ruby
single crystals
polarization
absorption cross sections
excitation
Doping (additives)
Temperature
Geometry

Keywords

  • distributed sensing
  • doped fiber
  • fluorescence
  • optical fiber sensors
  • ruby
  • temperature
  • two-photon excitation
  • optical fiber
  • lasers

Cite this

Dalzell, Craig J. ; Han, Thomas P. J. ; Ruddock, Ivan S. / Distributed crystal fiber sensing for extreme environments. In: IEEE Sensors Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 12, No. 1. pp. 164-167.
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Distributed crystal fiber sensing for extreme environments. / Dalzell, Craig J.; Han, Thomas P. J.; Ruddock, Ivan S.

In: IEEE Sensors Journal, Vol. 12, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 164-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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