Disinfector‐assisted low temperature reduced graphene oxide‐protein surgical dressing for the postoperative photothermal treatment of melanoma

Yuanhao Wu, Junyao Yang, Alexander van Teijlingen, Alice Berardo, Ilaria Corridori, Jingyu Feng, Jing Xu, Maria‐Magdalena Titirici, Jose Carlos Rodriguez‐Cabello, Nicola M Pugno, Jiaming Sun, Wen Wang, Tell Tuttle, Alvaro Mata

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Materials that combine the functionalities of both of proteins and graphene are of great interest for the engineering of biosensing, drug delivery, and regenerative devices. Graphene oxide (GO) offers an opportunity to design GO‐protein interactions but the need for harsh reduction processes to enable GO photoexcitation remains a limitation. A disinfector‐assisted low temperature method to reduce GO‐protein materials and fabricate surgical dressings with tuneable photothermal efficiency and bioactive properties for the postoperative treatment of melanoma is reported. The approach harnesses the capacity of 70% ethanol to penetrate the protein shell of microorganisms to infiltrate GO‐protein complexes and reduce GO at low temperature (85 °C) while maintaining the material structure and bioactivity. Both experiments and coarse‐grained simulations are used to describe the reduction process and assess the material properties. In vitro and in vivo validation revealed the capacity of the dressings to prevent tumor recurrence and promote healing after tumor resection.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2205802
Number of pages12
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume32
Issue number38
Early online date8 Jul 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Sept 2022

Keywords

  • research article
  • surgical dressing
  • disinfector‐assisted reduction
  • melanoma
  • photothermal treatment
  • reduced graphene oxide‐protein

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