Diphtheria-like disease caused by toxigenic corynebacterium ulcerans strain

Vartul Sangal, Leena Nieminen, Barbara Weinhardt, Jane Raeside, Nicholas P. Tucker, Catalina Diana Florea, Kevin G. Pollock, Paul A. Hoskisson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans is an increasingly reported cause of diphtheria in the United Kingdom and is often associated with a zoonotic origin (1,2). Here, we report a case of diphtheria caused by toxigenic C. ulcerans in a woman, 51 years of age, from Scotland, UK, who was admitted to a hospital in August 2013 with a swollen, sore throat and a gray-white membrane over the pharyngeal surface. The patient had returned from a 2-week family holiday in the state of Florida, United States, before the admission and also reported recent treatment of a pet dog for pharyngitis. The patient was believed to have been vaccinated against diphtheria during childhood. She was immediately admitted to an isolation ward and treated with a combination of clindamycin, penicillin, and metronidazole.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1257-1258
Number of pages2
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume20
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Fingerprint

Corynebacterium
Diphtheria
Pharyngitis
Holidays
Clindamycin
Pets
Metronidazole
Zoonoses
Scotland
Penicillins
Dogs
Membranes
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • corynebacterium ulcerans
  • diphtheria
  • vaccination

Cite this

Sangal, Vartul ; Nieminen, Leena ; Weinhardt, Barbara ; Raeside, Jane ; Tucker, Nicholas P. ; Florea, Catalina Diana ; Pollock, Kevin G. ; Hoskisson, Paul A. / Diphtheria-like disease caused by toxigenic corynebacterium ulcerans strain. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 7. pp. 1257-1258.
@article{6498b96d655e4cf591946b3e58f2160f,
title = "Diphtheria-like disease caused by toxigenic corynebacterium ulcerans strain",
abstract = "Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans is an increasingly reported cause of diphtheria in the United Kingdom and is often associated with a zoonotic origin (1,2). Here, we report a case of diphtheria caused by toxigenic C. ulcerans in a woman, 51 years of age, from Scotland, UK, who was admitted to a hospital in August 2013 with a swollen, sore throat and a gray-white membrane over the pharyngeal surface. The patient had returned from a 2-week family holiday in the state of Florida, United States, before the admission and also reported recent treatment of a pet dog for pharyngitis. The patient was believed to have been vaccinated against diphtheria during childhood. She was immediately admitted to an isolation ward and treated with a combination of clindamycin, penicillin, and metronidazole.",
keywords = "corynebacterium ulcerans, diphtheria, vaccination",
author = "Vartul Sangal and Leena Nieminen and Barbara Weinhardt and Jane Raeside and Tucker, {Nicholas P.} and Florea, {Catalina Diana} and Pollock, {Kevin G.} and Hoskisson, {Paul A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
doi = "10.3201/eid2007.140216",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "1257--1258",
journal = "Emerging Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1080-6059",
number = "7",

}

Sangal, V, Nieminen, L, Weinhardt, B, Raeside, J, Tucker, NP, Florea, CD, Pollock, KG & Hoskisson, PA 2014, 'Diphtheria-like disease caused by toxigenic corynebacterium ulcerans strain' Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 20, no. 7, pp. 1257-1258. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid2007.140216

Diphtheria-like disease caused by toxigenic corynebacterium ulcerans strain. / Sangal, Vartul; Nieminen, Leena; Weinhardt, Barbara; Raeside, Jane; Tucker, Nicholas P.; Florea, Catalina Diana; Pollock, Kevin G.; Hoskisson, Paul A.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 20, No. 7, 07.2014, p. 1257-1258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diphtheria-like disease caused by toxigenic corynebacterium ulcerans strain

AU - Sangal, Vartul

AU - Nieminen, Leena

AU - Weinhardt, Barbara

AU - Raeside, Jane

AU - Tucker, Nicholas P.

AU - Florea, Catalina Diana

AU - Pollock, Kevin G.

AU - Hoskisson, Paul A.

PY - 2014/7

Y1 - 2014/7

N2 - Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans is an increasingly reported cause of diphtheria in the United Kingdom and is often associated with a zoonotic origin (1,2). Here, we report a case of diphtheria caused by toxigenic C. ulcerans in a woman, 51 years of age, from Scotland, UK, who was admitted to a hospital in August 2013 with a swollen, sore throat and a gray-white membrane over the pharyngeal surface. The patient had returned from a 2-week family holiday in the state of Florida, United States, before the admission and also reported recent treatment of a pet dog for pharyngitis. The patient was believed to have been vaccinated against diphtheria during childhood. She was immediately admitted to an isolation ward and treated with a combination of clindamycin, penicillin, and metronidazole.

AB - Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans is an increasingly reported cause of diphtheria in the United Kingdom and is often associated with a zoonotic origin (1,2). Here, we report a case of diphtheria caused by toxigenic C. ulcerans in a woman, 51 years of age, from Scotland, UK, who was admitted to a hospital in August 2013 with a swollen, sore throat and a gray-white membrane over the pharyngeal surface. The patient had returned from a 2-week family holiday in the state of Florida, United States, before the admission and also reported recent treatment of a pet dog for pharyngitis. The patient was believed to have been vaccinated against diphtheria during childhood. She was immediately admitted to an isolation ward and treated with a combination of clindamycin, penicillin, and metronidazole.

KW - corynebacterium ulcerans

KW - diphtheria

KW - vaccination

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84902764909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/

U2 - 10.3201/eid2007.140216

DO - 10.3201/eid2007.140216

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 1257

EP - 1258

JO - Emerging Infectious Diseases

T2 - Emerging Infectious Diseases

JF - Emerging Infectious Diseases

SN - 1080-6059

IS - 7

ER -