Did Keynes in the General Theory Significantly Misrepresent J S Mill?

Roy H Grieve

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

It has been alleged that J M Keynes, quoting in the General Theory a passage from J S Mill’s Principles, misunderstood the passage in question and was therefore wrong to cite Mill as an upholder of the ‘classical’ proposition that ‘supply creates its own demand’. We believe that, although Keynes was admittedly in error with respect to, so-to-say, the ‘letter’ of Mill’s exposition, he did not mislead readers as to the ‘substance’ of Mill’s conception. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that J S Mill did indeed stand for a ‘classical’ position, vulnerable to Keynes’s critique as developed in the General Theory.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Pages1-25
Number of pages26
Volume13
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

General theory
John Maynard Keynes
John Stuart Mill
Conception

Keywords

  • keynes and the 'classics'
  • john stuart mill
  • say's law

Cite this

Grieve, R. H. (2013). Did Keynes in the General Theory Significantly Misrepresent J S Mill? (23 ed.) (pp. 1-25). Glasgow: University of Strathclyde.
Grieve, Roy H. / Did Keynes in the General Theory Significantly Misrepresent J S Mill?. 23. ed. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2013. pp. 1-25
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Grieve, RH 2013 'Did Keynes in the General Theory Significantly Misrepresent J S Mill?' 23 edn, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, pp. 1-25.

Did Keynes in the General Theory Significantly Misrepresent J S Mill? / Grieve, Roy H.

23. ed. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2013. p. 1-25.

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

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Grieve RH. Did Keynes in the General Theory Significantly Misrepresent J S Mill? 23 ed. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde. 2013, p. 1-25.