Development of transient myasthenia-like symptoms in chickens injected with acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata

T. Barkas, R. Harrison, G. G. Lunt, C. M. Watson, A. L. Harvey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

From the results obtained it appears that, although anti-(acetylcholine receptor) antibodies are produced in all chickens immunized with Torpedo receptor, myasthenia-like symptoms may only occur in those birds that develop a relatively rapid humoral response, and, even in these cases, the chickens eventually recover. The relative resistance of chickens to experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis could clearly result from a number of factors. Some chicken muscles are known to be multiply innervated (Bowman & Marshall, 1971) and a relatively high number of acetylcholine receptors could contribute to resistance, as could a more rapid turnover of receptor and/or of immunoglobulins in chickens compared with other experimental animals.

LanguageEnglish
Pages634-636
Number of pages3
JournalBiochemical Society Transactions
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1978

Fingerprint

Torpedo
Cholinergic Receptors
Chickens
Birds
Muscle
Immunoglobulins
Animals
Autoimmune Experimental Myasthenia Gravis
Antibodies
Muscles
carbosulfan

Keywords

  • antibody
  • cholinergic receptor
  • humoral immunity
  • muscle
  • myasthenia gravis

Cite this

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abstract = "From the results obtained it appears that, although anti-(acetylcholine receptor) antibodies are produced in all chickens immunized with Torpedo receptor, myasthenia-like symptoms may only occur in those birds that develop a relatively rapid humoral response, and, even in these cases, the chickens eventually recover. The relative resistance of chickens to experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis could clearly result from a number of factors. Some chicken muscles are known to be multiply innervated (Bowman & Marshall, 1971) and a relatively high number of acetylcholine receptors could contribute to resistance, as could a more rapid turnover of receptor and/or of immunoglobulins in chickens compared with other experimental animals.",
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Development of transient myasthenia-like symptoms in chickens injected with acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo marmorata. / Barkas, T.; Harrison, R.; Lunt, G. G.; Watson, C. M.; Harvey, A. L.

In: Biochemical Society Transactions, Vol. 6, No. 3, 01.01.1978, p. 634-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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