Development of solid lipid nanoparticles for enhanced solubility of poorly soluble drugs

Sriharsha Gupta Potta, Sriharsha Minemi, Ravi Kumar Nukala, Chairmane Peinado, Dimitrios A. Lamprou, Andrew Urquhart, D. Douroumis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cyclosporine (CyA) solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared by using a solvent free high pressure homogenization process. CyA was incorporated into SLNs that consisted of stearic acid, trilaurin or tripalmitin lipid solid cores in order to enhance drug solubility. The process was conducted by varying lipid compositions, drug initial loading and applied homogenization pressure. The processing temperatures were above the lipid melting points for all formulations. The empty and CyA loaded SLN particles made were characterized for particle size stability over six months. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) showed particle sizes ranging from 112-177 nm for empty and 181-215 nm for loaded SLNs each with narrow particle size distributions. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to characterize the CyA state, which was found to be amorphous, within the lipid cores of freeze-dried SLNs. The CyA metastable form showed a profound effect on the drug dissolution rates. SLNs were incubated in Caco-2 cells for 24 hr showing negligible cell cytotoxicity up to 15 mg/ml.
LanguageEnglish
Pages634-640
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Biomedical Nanotechnology
Volume6
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2010

Fingerprint

Nanoparticles
Solubility
Lipids
Particle Size
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Particle size
Photon correlation spectroscopy
Pressure
Stearic acid
Caco-2 Cells
Atomic Force Microscopy
Differential Scanning Calorimetry
Cytotoxicity
Photons
X-Ray Diffraction
Particle size analysis
Freezing
Cyclosporine
Melting point
Differential scanning calorimetry

Keywords

  • solid lipid nanoparticles
  • high pressure homogenization
  • cyclosporine
  • cytotoxicity
  • delivery-systems
  • SLN
  • emulsion
  • carriers
  • release

Cite this

Potta, S. G., Minemi, S., Nukala, R. K., Peinado, C., Lamprou, D. A., Urquhart, A., & Douroumis, D. (2010). Development of solid lipid nanoparticles for enhanced solubility of poorly soluble drugs. Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, 6(6), 634-640. https://doi.org/10.1166/jbn.2010.1169
Potta, Sriharsha Gupta ; Minemi, Sriharsha ; Nukala, Ravi Kumar ; Peinado, Chairmane ; Lamprou, Dimitrios A. ; Urquhart, Andrew ; Douroumis, D. / Development of solid lipid nanoparticles for enhanced solubility of poorly soluble drugs. In: Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology. 2010 ; Vol. 6, No. 6. pp. 634-640.
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Potta, SG, Minemi, S, Nukala, RK, Peinado, C, Lamprou, DA, Urquhart, A & Douroumis, D 2010, 'Development of solid lipid nanoparticles for enhanced solubility of poorly soluble drugs' Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, vol. 6, no. 6, pp. 634-640. https://doi.org/10.1166/jbn.2010.1169

Development of solid lipid nanoparticles for enhanced solubility of poorly soluble drugs. / Potta, Sriharsha Gupta; Minemi, Sriharsha; Nukala, Ravi Kumar; Peinado, Chairmane; Lamprou, Dimitrios A.; Urquhart, Andrew; Douroumis, D.

In: Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology, Vol. 6, No. 6, 12.2010, p. 634-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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