Development of an antimicrobial blended white LED system containing pulsed 405-nm LEDs for decontamination applications

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This study details the design, build and testing of a prototype antimicrobial blended white light unit containing pulsed red, yellow, green and 405nm LEDs. With a push for alternative methods of disinfection, optical methods have become a topic of interest. Ultra-violet (UV) light is widely known for its antimicrobial properties however; 405nm light has demonstrated significant antimicrobial properties against many common hospital acquired pathogens. In this study, a pulsed, blended, white-light prototype with a high content of 405 nm antimicrobial light, was designed, built and tested. Antimicrobial efficacy testing of the prototype was conducted using Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas. aeruginosa, two bacteria which are common causes of hospital acquired infections. These were exposure to 3 different light outputs from the prototype and the surviving bacteria enumerated. Results showed that the mixed light output provided a much better CRI and light output under which to work. Also, the light output containing 405 nm light provided an antimicrobial effect, with decontamination of 103 CFUml-1 populations of both bacterial species. The other light content (red, yellow, green) had no beneficial or adverse effects on the antimicrobial properties of the 405nm light. The results suggest that with further development, it could be possible to produce an antimicrobial blended white light containing pulsed 405nm light that could supplement or even replace standard white lighting in certain environments.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationDesign and Quality for Biomedical Technologies X
Place of PublicationBellingham, WA
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2017
EventDesign and Quality for Biomedical Technologies X - San Francisco, United States
Duration: 28 Jan 201729 Jan 2017

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE
Volume10056

Conference

ConferenceDesign and Quality for Biomedical Technologies X
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco
Period28/01/1729/01/17

Fingerprint

decontamination
Decontamination
Light emitting diodes
light emitting diodes
prototypes
output
bacteria
Bacteria
pseudomonas
staphylococcus
pathogens
Disinfection
Testing
supplements
Pathogens
infectious diseases
ultraviolet radiation
illuminating

Keywords

  • 405nm light
  • pulsed LEDs
  • blending
  • disinfection
  • environmental contamination
  • antimicrobial
  • violet light
  • efficacy

Cite this

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title = "Development of an antimicrobial blended white LED system containing pulsed 405-nm LEDs for decontamination applications",
abstract = "This study details the design, build and testing of a prototype antimicrobial blended white light unit containing pulsed red, yellow, green and 405nm LEDs. With a push for alternative methods of disinfection, optical methods have become a topic of interest. Ultra-violet (UV) light is widely known for its antimicrobial properties however; 405nm light has demonstrated significant antimicrobial properties against many common hospital acquired pathogens. In this study, a pulsed, blended, white-light prototype with a high content of 405 nm antimicrobial light, was designed, built and tested. Antimicrobial efficacy testing of the prototype was conducted using Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas. aeruginosa, two bacteria which are common causes of hospital acquired infections. These were exposure to 3 different light outputs from the prototype and the surviving bacteria enumerated. Results showed that the mixed light output provided a much better CRI and light output under which to work. Also, the light output containing 405 nm light provided an antimicrobial effect, with decontamination of 103 CFUml-1 populations of both bacterial species. The other light content (red, yellow, green) had no beneficial or adverse effects on the antimicrobial properties of the 405nm light. The results suggest that with further development, it could be possible to produce an antimicrobial blended white light containing pulsed 405nm light that could supplement or even replace standard white lighting in certain environments.",
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author = "Gillespie, {Jonathan B.} and Michelle MacLean and Wilson, {Mark P.} and Given, {Martin J.} and MacGregor, {Scott J.}",
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Gillespie, JB, MacLean, M, Wilson, MP, Given, MJ & MacGregor, SJ 2017, Development of an antimicrobial blended white LED system containing pulsed 405-nm LEDs for decontamination applications. in Design and Quality for Biomedical Technologies X., 100560Y, Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 10056, Bellingham, WA, Design and Quality for Biomedical Technologies X, San Francisco, United States, 28/01/17. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2250539

Development of an antimicrobial blended white LED system containing pulsed 405-nm LEDs for decontamination applications. / Gillespie, Jonathan B.; MacLean, Michelle; Wilson, Mark P.; Given, Martin J.; MacGregor, Scott J.

Design and Quality for Biomedical Technologies X. Bellingham, WA, 2017. 100560Y (Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 10056).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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