Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland

Scott McDonald, Sharon Hutchinson, Norah Elizabeth Palmateer, Elizabeth Allen, Sheila O. Cameron, Goldberg David J., Avril Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can significantly reduce health-related quality of life (QoL), but it is not clear if reduction is associated with the infection or with being aware of one's infection status. Understanding the impact of a HCV diagnosis on QoL is essential to inform decision-making regarding screening/testing and treatment. Using a cross-sectional design, we assessed QoL in 2898 people who inject drugs (PWID), surveyed in Scotland during 2010 using EQ-5D. Multifactorial regression compared self-reported QoL between PWID who were (i) chronically HCV-infected and aware of their infected status, (ii) chronically HCV-infected but unaware, and (iii) not chronically infected.
Median time since onset of injecting was 10years; not chronically infected PWID were younger and had shorter injecting careers than chronically infected PWID. Median EQ-5D was highest for the not chronically infected and the chronic/unaware groups (0.73) compared with the chronic/aware group (0.66). After adjustment for demographic and behavioural co-factors, QoL was significantly reduced in chronic/aware compared with chronic/unaware PWID (adjusted B=-0.09, p=0.005); there was no evidence for a difference in QoL between not chronically infected and chronic/unaware PWID (adjusted B=-0.03, p=0.13). Awareness of one's chronic HCV status was associated with reduced health-related QoL, but there was no evidence for further reduction attributable to chronic infection itself after adjusting for important covariate differences.

LanguageEnglish
Pages460-466
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Hepatology
Volume58
Issue number3
Early online date10 Nov 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Scotland
Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Quality of Life
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Chronic Hepatitis C
Infection
Decision Making
Demography

Keywords

  • hepatitis C virus
  • HCV
  • injecting drug users
  • scotland
  • quality of life
  • infection
  • awareness

Cite this

McDonald, Scott ; Hutchinson, Sharon ; Palmateer, Norah Elizabeth ; Allen, Elizabeth ; Cameron, Sheila O. ; David J., Goldberg ; Taylor, Avril. / Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland. In: Journal of Hepatology. 2013 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 460-466.
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Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland. / McDonald, Scott; Hutchinson, Sharon; Palmateer, Norah Elizabeth; Allen, Elizabeth; Cameron, Sheila O.; David J., Goldberg; Taylor, Avril.

In: Journal of Hepatology, Vol. 58, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 460-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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