Death of buildings in consumer culture: natural death, architectural murder and cultural rape

Stephanie Anderson, Andrea Tonner, Kathy Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We propose that focusing on the death of buildings has much to offer in terms of our understanding of consumer culture. The aim of this paper is to explore the death of buildings from the perspective of consumers who have an interest in exploring obsolete buildings. Drawing on an ethnographic study of urban exploration, we uncover consumer understandings of death and mortality. We make a number of contributions. First, we demonstrate how death terminology is appropriate to material culture. Second, we reveal how consumer fascination with derelict buildings opens up opportunities for otherwise suppressed thoughts and conversations about death. Third, we recognise the multidimensional nature of death and introduce the concept of cultural death in consumer culture.
LanguageEnglish
Pages387-402
Number of pages6
JournalConsumption, Markets and Culture
Volume20
Issue number5
Early online date7 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Sep 2017

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Rape
Homicide
rape
homicide
building
death
Terminology
Consumer culture
technical language
conversation
mortality
Mortality

Keywords

  • conusmer culture
  • buildings
  • consumers
  • death
  • urban exploration
  • ethnography

Cite this

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Death of buildings in consumer culture : natural death, architectural murder and cultural rape. / Anderson, Stephanie; Tonner, Andrea; Hamilton, Kathy.

In: Consumption, Markets and Culture, Vol. 20, No. 5, 30.09.2017, p. 387-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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