Culture as a predictor of entrepreneurial activity

S. Hunt, J.D. Levie, W.D. Bygrave (Editor)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This research examines the extent to which culture can explain differences in entrepreneurial activity, and determines the importance of various cultural constructs derived from Hofstede and the World Values Survey. These constructs are applied to data from the 2002 Global Entrepreneurship measuring individuals' entrepreneurial activity from 37 countries. The results indicate that culture explains only a small proportion of the variance in entrepreneurial activity and attitudes. Different entrepreneurial activities are weakly influenced by different, but not mutually exclusive, sets of cultural constructs. Population growth, however, has a significant and strong effect on all major measures of business start-up activity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrontiers of entrepreneurship research 2003 : proceedings of the twenty-third annual entrepreneurship research conference
Place of PublicationBabson Park, USA
Pages171-185
Number of pages14
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Entrepreneurial activity
Predictors
Population growth
Hofstede
World Values Survey
Proportion
Business start-up
Entrepreneurship

Keywords

  • culture
  • entrepreneurial activity
  • entrepreneurship
  • population growth
  • business

Cite this

Hunt, S., Levie, J. D., & Bygrave, W. D. (Ed.) (2003). Culture as a predictor of entrepreneurial activity. In Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2003 : proceedings of the twenty-third annual entrepreneurship research conference (pp. 171-185). Babson Park, USA.
Hunt, S. ; Levie, J.D. ; Bygrave, W.D. (Editor). / Culture as a predictor of entrepreneurial activity. Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2003 : proceedings of the twenty-third annual entrepreneurship research conference. Babson Park, USA, 2003. pp. 171-185
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Hunt, S, Levie, JD & Bygrave, WD (ed.) 2003, Culture as a predictor of entrepreneurial activity. in Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2003 : proceedings of the twenty-third annual entrepreneurship research conference. Babson Park, USA, pp. 171-185.

Culture as a predictor of entrepreneurial activity. / Hunt, S.; Levie, J.D.; Bygrave, W.D. (Editor).

Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2003 : proceedings of the twenty-third annual entrepreneurship research conference. Babson Park, USA, 2003. p. 171-185.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Hunt S, Levie JD, Bygrave WD, (ed.). Culture as a predictor of entrepreneurial activity. In Frontiers of entrepreneurship research 2003 : proceedings of the twenty-third annual entrepreneurship research conference. Babson Park, USA. 2003. p. 171-185