Cross-infection effect of polymers of historic and heritage significance on the degradation of a cellulose reference test material

Katherine Curran, Alenka Možir, Mark Underhill, Lorraine T. Gibson, Tom Fearn, Matija Strlič

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)
64 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The cross-infection effect of 105 polymer samples was studied, using cellulose as a reference test material. In total 14 polymer types were studied, comprising “modern materials” commonly found in historic and artistic collections including: cellulose acetate (CA), cellulose nitrate (CN), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), polyurethane (PUR) and a selection of specialised packaging materials used in art and heritage conservation. Polymer samples were placed in glass vials containing a piece of the cellulose reference and vials were sealed before being heated to 80 C for 14 days. The cross-infection effect on the reference cellulose was measured using viscometry to calculate the degree of polymerisation relative to that of a control reference and a classification system of the cross-infection or preservation effect is proposed. Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME)-GC/MS was used to detect and identify the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a select number of polymer samples. CN was identified as the polymer with the most severe cross-infection effect while others e.g. polycarbonate (PC) had no effect or even a beneficial effect. Acetic acid was found to be the most characteristic emission detected from the most severely cross-infecting materials.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)294–306
Number of pages13
JournalPolymer Degradation and Stability
Volume107
Early online date18 Dec 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Fingerprint

materials tests
infectious diseases
cellulose
Cellulose
Polymers
degradation
Degradation
polymers
Nitrocellulose
polycarbonate
Collodion
cellulose nitrate
Vinyl Chloride
Volatile Organic Compounds
Packaging materials
Polyurethanes
Viscosity measurement
viscometry
Polycarbonates
Volatile organic compounds

Keywords

  • cross-infection
  • volatile organic compounds
  • gas chromatography
  • heritage conservation

Cite this

Curran, Katherine ; Možir, Alenka ; Underhill, Mark ; Gibson, Lorraine T. ; Fearn, Tom ; Strlič, Matija. / Cross-infection effect of polymers of historic and heritage significance on the degradation of a cellulose reference test material. In: Polymer Degradation and Stability. 2014 ; Vol. 107. pp. 294–306.
@article{981249be71ae4aaaa967f1ac83655fa6,
title = "Cross-infection effect of polymers of historic and heritage significance on the degradation of a cellulose reference test material",
abstract = "The cross-infection effect of 105 polymer samples was studied, using cellulose as a reference test material. In total 14 polymer types were studied, comprising “modern materials” commonly found in historic and artistic collections including: cellulose acetate (CA), cellulose nitrate (CN), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), polyurethane (PUR) and a selection of specialised packaging materials used in art and heritage conservation. Polymer samples were placed in glass vials containing a piece of the cellulose reference and vials were sealed before being heated to 80 C for 14 days. The cross-infection effect on the reference cellulose was measured using viscometry to calculate the degree of polymerisation relative to that of a control reference and a classification system of the cross-infection or preservation effect is proposed. Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME)-GC/MS was used to detect and identify the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a select number of polymer samples. CN was identified as the polymer with the most severe cross-infection effect while others e.g. polycarbonate (PC) had no effect or even a beneficial effect. Acetic acid was found to be the most characteristic emission detected from the most severely cross-infecting materials.",
keywords = "cross-infection, volatile organic compounds, gas chromatography, heritage conservation",
author = "Katherine Curran and Alenka Možir and Mark Underhill and Gibson, {Lorraine T.} and Tom Fearn and Matija Strlič",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.polymdegradstab.2013.12.019",
language = "English",
volume = "107",
pages = "294–306",
journal = "Polymer Degradation and Stability",
issn = "0141-3910",

}

Cross-infection effect of polymers of historic and heritage significance on the degradation of a cellulose reference test material. / Curran, Katherine; Možir, Alenka; Underhill, Mark; Gibson, Lorraine T.; Fearn, Tom; Strlič, Matija.

In: Polymer Degradation and Stability, Vol. 107, 09.2014, p. 294–306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cross-infection effect of polymers of historic and heritage significance on the degradation of a cellulose reference test material

AU - Curran, Katherine

AU - Možir, Alenka

AU - Underhill, Mark

AU - Gibson, Lorraine T.

AU - Fearn, Tom

AU - Strlič, Matija

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - The cross-infection effect of 105 polymer samples was studied, using cellulose as a reference test material. In total 14 polymer types were studied, comprising “modern materials” commonly found in historic and artistic collections including: cellulose acetate (CA), cellulose nitrate (CN), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), polyurethane (PUR) and a selection of specialised packaging materials used in art and heritage conservation. Polymer samples were placed in glass vials containing a piece of the cellulose reference and vials were sealed before being heated to 80 C for 14 days. The cross-infection effect on the reference cellulose was measured using viscometry to calculate the degree of polymerisation relative to that of a control reference and a classification system of the cross-infection or preservation effect is proposed. Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME)-GC/MS was used to detect and identify the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a select number of polymer samples. CN was identified as the polymer with the most severe cross-infection effect while others e.g. polycarbonate (PC) had no effect or even a beneficial effect. Acetic acid was found to be the most characteristic emission detected from the most severely cross-infecting materials.

AB - The cross-infection effect of 105 polymer samples was studied, using cellulose as a reference test material. In total 14 polymer types were studied, comprising “modern materials” commonly found in historic and artistic collections including: cellulose acetate (CA), cellulose nitrate (CN), poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), polyurethane (PUR) and a selection of specialised packaging materials used in art and heritage conservation. Polymer samples were placed in glass vials containing a piece of the cellulose reference and vials were sealed before being heated to 80 C for 14 days. The cross-infection effect on the reference cellulose was measured using viscometry to calculate the degree of polymerisation relative to that of a control reference and a classification system of the cross-infection or preservation effect is proposed. Solid phase micro-extraction (SPME)-GC/MS was used to detect and identify the emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a select number of polymer samples. CN was identified as the polymer with the most severe cross-infection effect while others e.g. polycarbonate (PC) had no effect or even a beneficial effect. Acetic acid was found to be the most characteristic emission detected from the most severely cross-infecting materials.

KW - cross-infection

KW - volatile organic compounds

KW - gas chromatography

KW - heritage conservation

U2 - 10.1016/j.polymdegradstab.2013.12.019

DO - 10.1016/j.polymdegradstab.2013.12.019

M3 - Article

VL - 107

SP - 294

EP - 306

JO - Polymer Degradation and Stability

JF - Polymer Degradation and Stability

SN - 0141-3910

ER -