Creativity and dysfunction in strategic processes: the case of scenario planning

Brad MacKay, Peter McKiernan

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    23 Citations (Scopus)
    60 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This paper attempts to open up a new line of enquiry into the dysfunctions of creativity within strategic processes. Generally, the impact and results of introducing creativity (and innovation) into organisational life are perceived to be wholesome and beneficial. But recent research in the area of organisational psychology has documented a ‘dark’ side to its introduction, e.g., low employee morale, stress, theft, sabotage, destructive conflict. Learning from this work and shifting the domain to strategic management, this paper focuses on scenario planning—a strategy process widely regarded by participants and facilitators as creative and innovative in structure, content and output. First, the creative credentials of the process are established with reference to the literature and definitions from the creative and cultural industries. Second, the process is deconstructed into activities and each is examined for the extent of its embedded creativity. Third, informed by case evidence, four dysfunctions of the scenario planning process are conjectured: creativity layered on fantasy; heightened expectations and confusion; pride and passion; and creativity leading to excess. The paper concludes by suggesting four options for handling these potential dysfunctional effects and, in the light of the dialogue presented, re-interprets the definition of scenario planning presented earlier in the text.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)271-281
    Number of pages11
    JournalFutures
    Volume42
    Issue number4
    Early online date18 Nov 2009
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2010

    Keywords

    • strategic processes
    • creativity
    • organisational psychology

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