Creating an event volunteering legacy: the 2014 Host City Volunteer initiative

Robert Rogerson, Fiona Reid, Rafaelle Nicholson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines why as part of the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, Glasgow Life failed to achieve its aspired legacy of promoting further volunteering by Host City Volunteers (HCVs) despite the implementation of best practice. This practice included providing dedicated funding of a volunteer legacy programme, supporting recruitment from groups generally under-represented amongst regular volunteers, and the provision of a dedicated team to support HCVs before, during and after the event. Drawing on research conducted at the time of the event and a follow up study three years later, the paper suggests that the absence of such legacy arose because, although highly motivated by the one-off prestigious event, the event volunteers were less motivated by other opportunities, many of those involved as event volunteers were already committed volunteers, and were reluctant to take over responsibility for engaging with future volunteering opportunities.

The paper considers the wider implications for future event managers seeking to generate volunteering legacies as part of major events. In so doing, it underlines that despite the scheme being constructed around the key characteristics of the much lauded benchmark model of event volunteering associated with the Manchester 2002 Commonwealth Games (Nichols and Ralston, 2012), volunteering legacies cannot be guaranteed. Even when there is success in engaging with people markedly different to the common type of event volunteer (Lockstone-Binney et al, 2015) in under-represented communities, translating their enthusiasm into post-event volunteering is problematic.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEvent Management
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 26 Nov 2019

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Commonwealth of Nations
event
city
Volunteering
Volunteers
major event
best practice
funding
manager
programme
responsibility

Keywords

  • event volunteering
  • commonwealth games
  • legacy planning
  • sporting mega event

Cite this

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Creating an event volunteering legacy : the 2014 Host City Volunteer initiative. / Rogerson, Robert; Reid, Fiona; Nicholson, Rafaelle.

In: Event Management, 26.11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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