Corporate parenting in the network society

Neil Ballantyne, Zachari Duncalf, Ellen Katherine Daly

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In the past few years the risks associated with use of the Internet and social networking sites by children and young people have become a recurrent focus of attention for the media, the public, and policymakers. Parents, caregivers, and child care professionals alike are rightly concerned about exposure to pornography, pedophiles, and cyberbullies. At the same time Internet researchers have been steadily collecting evidence about the actual opportunities and risks associated with the young people's use of the Internet. In this article we describe some of the emerging evidence on opportunities and risks for young people and consider the challenges for social welfare professional charged with the role of safeguarding “looked after” children.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages95-107
    Number of pages13
    JournalJournal of Technology in Human Services
    Volume28
    Issue number1-2
    Early online date28 Apr 2010
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint

    network society
    Parenting
    Internet
    Erotica
    Social Networking
    Bullying
    pornography
    Social Welfare
    Child Care
    child care
    social welfare
    Caregivers
    caregiver
    evidence
    networking
    parents
    Parents
    Research Personnel

    Keywords

    • social work
    • corporate parenting
    • human services

    Cite this

    Ballantyne, Neil ; Duncalf, Zachari ; Daly, Ellen Katherine. / Corporate parenting in the network society. In: Journal of Technology in Human Services. 2010 ; Vol. 28, No. 1-2. pp. 95-107.
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    Corporate parenting in the network society. / Ballantyne, Neil; Duncalf, Zachari; Daly, Ellen Katherine.

    In: Journal of Technology in Human Services, Vol. 28, No. 1-2, 2010, p. 95-107.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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