Containment and reciprocity in biological systems: a putative psychophysical organising principle

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

The stuff of life, the living substance that is common to all biological organisms, is the aqueous society of biochemical activity ongoing in every cell in every living body. The basic biochemical ‘reactions’ of life are largely similar with variations of a theme played out in different cells living in different environment, e.g. the core biochemical metabolic processes of all life likely stem from an ancient, early-earth ancestor (Smith & Morowitz, 2004). However, even more common to life than shared biochemistry are the basic structural properties of all cells and all living organisms into complexes of compartmentalised units. In this paper, I will argue there are common feelings driving the generation of these ubiquitous structures in nature and that these feelings may constitute one of several
primary forms of feeling in living systems.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationApplied Process Thought II
EditorsMark Dibben, Rebecca Newton
Place of PublicationFrankfurt/Paris/Lancaster
Pages133-148
Number of pages16
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Organizing
Psychophysical
Containment
Cells
Organism
Biochemistry
Ancestors
Living Body
Structural Properties

Keywords

  • biological systems
  • psychophysical systems

Cite this

Delafield-Butt, J. (2009). Containment and reciprocity in biological systems: a putative psychophysical organising principle. In M. Dibben, & R. Newton (Eds.), Applied Process Thought II (pp. 133-148). Frankfurt/Paris/Lancaster.
Delafield-Butt, Jonathan. / Containment and reciprocity in biological systems : a putative psychophysical organising principle. Applied Process Thought II. editor / Mark Dibben ; Rebecca Newton. Frankfurt/Paris/Lancaster, 2009. pp. 133-148
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Delafield-Butt, J 2009, Containment and reciprocity in biological systems: a putative psychophysical organising principle. in M Dibben & R Newton (eds), Applied Process Thought II. Frankfurt/Paris/Lancaster, pp. 133-148.

Containment and reciprocity in biological systems : a putative psychophysical organising principle. / Delafield-Butt, Jonathan.

Applied Process Thought II. ed. / Mark Dibben; Rebecca Newton. Frankfurt/Paris/Lancaster, 2009. p. 133-148.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)

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Delafield-Butt J. Containment and reciprocity in biological systems: a putative psychophysical organising principle. In Dibben M, Newton R, editors, Applied Process Thought II. Frankfurt/Paris/Lancaster. 2009. p. 133-148