Constitutional change and territorial consent: The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention

Aileen McHarg

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The United Kingdom that voted in 1975 on whether to remain in what was then the European Economic Community was a unitary state with a single legislature and single source of sovereign authority. Direct rule had recently been restored in Northern Ireland, and its devolved Parliament abolished; 1 devolution to Scotland and Wal es was under discussion, but no firm proposals were yet being considered. The referendum vote was counted on a territorial basis, and there was concern about the political implications of a territorially - divided result, particularly in the context of rising Scottish nationalism. But it would have been difficult to argue that territorial difference — which in the event never materialised — was constitutionally relevant.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe UK Constitution after Miller
Subtitle of host publicationBrexit and Beyond
EditorsMark Elliott, Jack Williams, Alison Young
Place of PublicationLondon
Chapter7
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2018

Fingerprint

EEC
referendum
parliament
decentralization
nationalism
voter
firm
event

Keywords

  • Brexit
  • European law
  • constitutional change
  • European Union
  • EU
  • UK Government
  • devolved administrations

Cite this

McHarg, A. (2018). Constitutional change and territorial consent: The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention. In M. Elliott, J. Williams, & A. Young (Eds.), The UK Constitution after Miller: Brexit and Beyond London.
McHarg, Aileen. / Constitutional change and territorial consent : The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention. The UK Constitution after Miller: Brexit and Beyond. editor / Mark Elliott ; Jack Williams ; Alison Young. London, 2018.
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McHarg, A 2018, Constitutional change and territorial consent: The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention. in M Elliott, J Williams & A Young (eds), The UK Constitution after Miller: Brexit and Beyond. London.

Constitutional change and territorial consent : The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention. / McHarg, Aileen.

The UK Constitution after Miller: Brexit and Beyond. ed. / Mark Elliott; Jack Williams; Alison Young. London, 2018.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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McHarg A. Constitutional change and territorial consent: The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention. In Elliott M, Williams J, Young A, editors, The UK Constitution after Miller: Brexit and Beyond. London. 2018