Constitutional change and territorial consent: The Miller Case and the Sewel Convention

Aileen McHarg

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Abstract

The United Kingdom that voted in 1975 on whether to remain in what was then the European Economic Community was a unitary state with a single legislature and single source of sovereign authority. Direct rule had recently been restored in Northern Ireland, and its devolved Parliament abolished; 1 devolution to Scotland and Wal es was under discussion, but no firm proposals were yet being considered. The referendum vote was counted on a territorial basis, and there was concern about the political implications of a territorially - divided result, particularly in the context of rising Scottish nationalism. But it would have been difficult to argue that territorial difference — which in the event never materialised — was constitutionally relevant.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe UK Constitution after Miller
Subtitle of host publicationBrexit and Beyond
EditorsMark Elliott, Jack Williams, Alison Young
Place of PublicationLondon
Chapter7
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Brexit
  • European law
  • constitutional change
  • European Union
  • EU
  • UK Government
  • devolved administrations

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