Competence over constitution: the SNP's re-election in 2011

Robert Johns, Christopher Carman, James Mitchell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Scottish National Party’s outright win in the Scottish Parliament election on 5 May 2011 confounded pre-election polls and commentaries as well as devolution’s architects who chose a (broadly) proportional electoral system to minimise the risk of a Nationalist majority moving Scotland to independence. But an extraordinary result in historical context looks much more ordinary when we explore voters’ attitudes and choices. According to data from the ESRC-funded Scottish Election Study 2011 (SES), the SNP won its majority for that most mundane of electoral reasons: most voters thought that the party would do a better job in office than its rivals, including its chief rival, the Labour Party.
LanguageEnglish
JournalPolitical Studies
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2012

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constitution
election
Labour Party
election research
electoral system
architect
parliament
decentralization

Keywords

  • constitution
  • constitutional change
  • SNP
  • Scottish National Party
  • Scottish Parliament
  • Scotland
  • Scottish politics
  • election

Cite this

Johns, R., Carman, C., & Mitchell, J. (Accepted/In press). Competence over constitution: the SNP's re-election in 2011. Political Studies.
Johns, Robert ; Carman, Christopher ; Mitchell, James. / Competence over constitution : the SNP's re-election in 2011. In: Political Studies. 2012.
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Competence over constitution : the SNP's re-election in 2011. / Johns, Robert; Carman, Christopher; Mitchell, James.

In: Political Studies, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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