Community justice, time and the new national probation service

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Amongst the staff in the highly managerialised agencies of contemporary criminal justice, there is a clear and often painful awareness of ever-tighter deadlines and increasing time scarcity. Nonetheless it has been correctly observed that ‘academic investigation of such issues has been hampered by the limited conceptions of time involved’. This is particularly true in criminology. The sociological understanding of time has grown apace in recent years but tends to have remained a specialist preserve which has impacted little on reflection about criminal justice processes. This article is an implicit commendation of the ‘sociology of time’ to criminologists, and an explicit application of some of its concepts and insights to the emerging National Probation Service in England and Wales, as projected in its recent mission statement, A New Choreography. The targets and deadlines set for the new Service are premised upon a commonplace but problematic notion of ‘managerial time’, which in a variety of ways is at odds with the feasible pace of change in the many local communities with which the Service will be working.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages59-86
    Number of pages28
    JournalThe Howard Journal of Crime and Justice
    Volume41
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

    Fingerprint

    probation service
    justice
    community
    criminology
    sociology
    time
    staff

    Keywords

    • community justice
    • National Probation Service
    • probation

    Cite this

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    title = "Community justice, time and the new national probation service",
    abstract = "Amongst the staff in the highly managerialised agencies of contemporary criminal justice, there is a clear and often painful awareness of ever-tighter deadlines and increasing time scarcity. Nonetheless it has been correctly observed that ‘academic investigation of such issues has been hampered by the limited conceptions of time involved’. This is particularly true in criminology. The sociological understanding of time has grown apace in recent years but tends to have remained a specialist preserve which has impacted little on reflection about criminal justice processes. This article is an implicit commendation of the ‘sociology of time’ to criminologists, and an explicit application of some of its concepts and insights to the emerging National Probation Service in England and Wales, as projected in its recent mission statement, A New Choreography. The targets and deadlines set for the new Service are premised upon a commonplace but problematic notion of ‘managerial time’, which in a variety of ways is at odds with the feasible pace of change in the many local communities with which the Service will be working.",
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    Community justice, time and the new national probation service. / Nellis, M.

    In: The Howard Journal of Crime and Justice, Vol. 41, No. 1, 2002, p. 59-86.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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