Cold War on the cheap: Soviet and Czechoslovak intelligence in the Congo, 1960-1963

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In July 1960, the chairman of the Soviet Committee on State Alexander Shelepin, hosted a high-level delegation from the Czechoslovak Security (StB; Státní Bezpečnost) headed by the Czechoslovak minister Rudolf Barák. A former head of the Soviet Youth Organization (Komsomol) protégé of the first secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Soviet Union (CC CPSU), Nikita Khrushchev, Shelepin was a rising So was his counterpart, Barák, an ambitious and dynamic member of Communist Party who had a taste for foreign affairs and was rumoured ambitions to supersede Antonín Novotný as first secretary.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWarsaw Pact Intervention in the Third World
Subtitle of host publicationAid and Influence in the Cold War
EditorsPhilip Muehlenbeck, Natalia Telepneva
Place of PublicationLondon
Pages123-148
Number of pages26
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jul 2018

Keywords

  • Soviet Union
  • Czechoslovakian history
  • Cold War
  • Congo
  • African history
  • secret agent
  • Central Intelligence Agency
  • Central and Eastern Europe

Research Output

Saving Ghana's revolution: the demise of Kwame Nkrumah and the evolution of Soviet policy in Africa, 1966–1972

Telepneva, N., 22 Feb 2019, In : Journal of Cold War Studies. 20, 4, p. 4-25 22 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Open Access
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Activities

  • 1 Types of Public engagement and outreach - Media article or participation

Talk for SRB Podcast: Soviet Intelligence and African National Liberation

Natalia Telepneva (Interviewee)

5 Apr 2019

Activity: Other activity typesTypes of Public engagement and outreach - Media article or participation

Cite this

Telepneva, N. (2018). Cold War on the cheap: Soviet and Czechoslovak intelligence in the Congo, 1960-1963. In P. Muehlenbeck, & N. Telepneva (Eds.), Warsaw Pact Intervention in the Third World: Aid and Influence in the Cold War (pp. 123-148). http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/101167/