Closing the attainment gap – a realistic proposition or an elusive pipe-dream?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The attainment gap associated with socio-economic status is an international problem that is highly resistant to change. This conceptual paper critiques the drive by the Scottish Government to address the attainment gap through the Scottish Attainment Challenge and the National Improvement Framework. It draws upon a range of theoretical perspectives but principally examines the problem through the lens of Steiner- Khamsi’s (2014) concepts of ‘reception’ and ‘translation’ of policy and through examination of the international and national (Scottish) policy contexts. The paper argues that, rather than focussing narrowly upon attainment outcomes, an holistic approach should be adopted which takes account of the economic, social and relational constraints which impact upon families in poverty, calling for a systems-level approach. ‘Schools cannot go it alone’: there is a need to focus upon a wide range of public policy to redress inequalities in society. Whilst the Scottish Government has looked to the London/City/National Challenge as a potential solution to the problem, the complexities and limitations of policy borrowing need to be understood. Higher Education Institutions, government agencies, local authorities and schools need to work in partnership to develop research informed practice which will impact upon learning outcomes for all children and young people.
LanguageEnglish
Pages299-321
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Education Policy
Volume33
Issue number2
Early online date13 Jul 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Dec 2017

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holistic approach
research practice
government agency
school
economics
public policy
poverty
examination
learning
Government
education
Society
Poverty
Public Policy
Economics
Reception
Borrowing
Authority
Learning Outcomes
Socioeconomic Status

Keywords

  • social justice
  • policy
  • policy borrowing
  • systems leadership

Cite this

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Closing the attainment gap – a realistic proposition or an elusive pipe-dream? / Mowat, Joan Gaynor.

In: Journal of Education Policy, Vol. 33, No. 2, 27.12.2017, p. 299-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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