Clinical supervision in child protection for community nurses

Pam Green Lister, B. Crisp

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    19 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Community nurses have been recognized as having a key role in the protection and care of children, particularly in relation to the identification and detection of child abuse. In order to fulfill this role in a competent manner, they need to have access to appropriate supervision. The aim of this paper is to explore community nurses' and health care managers' understanding and experience of clinical supervision in child protection. The findings presented here were collected as part of a larger study commissioned by the Greater Glasgow Primary Health Care National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Ninety-nine nurses and nursing managers were interviewed, either individually or in groups, about their professional involvement in child protection issues and support for their involvement in child protection work, as well as their current knowledge and perceived training needs. The interview data was subjected to a thematic analysis. A lack of consensus was found among nurses and managers in Glasgow as to what constitutes clinical supervision and a good deal of variation in nurses' experiences of clinical supervision in the field of child protection. The historical difficulties with regard to supervision were attributed to several aspects of nursing culture. However, both nurses and managers emphasized the need for formal, regular, systematic supervision for all nurses regardless of their specific role with regard to child protection.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages57-72
    Number of pages16
    JournalChild Abuse Review
    Volume14
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

    Fingerprint

    child protection
    supervision
    nurse
    Nurses
    community
    Nurse Administrators
    manager
    Nursing
    nursing
    Community Health Services
    health care
    Child Abuse
    National Health Programs
    Child Care
    abuse of children
    Primary Health Care
    Interviews
    health service
    experience
    lack

    Keywords

    • child protection
    • community nursing
    • health visiting
    • clinical supervision

    Cite this

    Green Lister, Pam ; Crisp, B. / Clinical supervision in child protection for community nurses. In: Child Abuse Review. 2005 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 57-72.
    @article{d72f5802f0c44b1991efed3e2d16c296,
    title = "Clinical supervision in child protection for community nurses",
    abstract = "Community nurses have been recognized as having a key role in the protection and care of children, particularly in relation to the identification and detection of child abuse. In order to fulfill this role in a competent manner, they need to have access to appropriate supervision. The aim of this paper is to explore community nurses' and health care managers' understanding and experience of clinical supervision in child protection. The findings presented here were collected as part of a larger study commissioned by the Greater Glasgow Primary Health Care National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Ninety-nine nurses and nursing managers were interviewed, either individually or in groups, about their professional involvement in child protection issues and support for their involvement in child protection work, as well as their current knowledge and perceived training needs. The interview data was subjected to a thematic analysis. A lack of consensus was found among nurses and managers in Glasgow as to what constitutes clinical supervision and a good deal of variation in nurses' experiences of clinical supervision in the field of child protection. The historical difficulties with regard to supervision were attributed to several aspects of nursing culture. However, both nurses and managers emphasized the need for formal, regular, systematic supervision for all nurses regardless of their specific role with regard to child protection.",
    keywords = "child protection, community nursing, health visiting, clinical supervision",
    author = "{Green Lister}, Pam and B. Crisp",
    year = "2005",
    doi = "10.1002/car.873",
    language = "English",
    volume = "14",
    pages = "57--72",
    journal = "Child Abuse Review",
    issn = "0952-9136",
    number = "1",

    }

    Clinical supervision in child protection for community nurses. / Green Lister, Pam; Crisp, B.

    In: Child Abuse Review, Vol. 14, No. 1, 2005, p. 57-72.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Clinical supervision in child protection for community nurses

    AU - Green Lister, Pam

    AU - Crisp, B.

    PY - 2005

    Y1 - 2005

    N2 - Community nurses have been recognized as having a key role in the protection and care of children, particularly in relation to the identification and detection of child abuse. In order to fulfill this role in a competent manner, they need to have access to appropriate supervision. The aim of this paper is to explore community nurses' and health care managers' understanding and experience of clinical supervision in child protection. The findings presented here were collected as part of a larger study commissioned by the Greater Glasgow Primary Health Care National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Ninety-nine nurses and nursing managers were interviewed, either individually or in groups, about their professional involvement in child protection issues and support for their involvement in child protection work, as well as their current knowledge and perceived training needs. The interview data was subjected to a thematic analysis. A lack of consensus was found among nurses and managers in Glasgow as to what constitutes clinical supervision and a good deal of variation in nurses' experiences of clinical supervision in the field of child protection. The historical difficulties with regard to supervision were attributed to several aspects of nursing culture. However, both nurses and managers emphasized the need for formal, regular, systematic supervision for all nurses regardless of their specific role with regard to child protection.

    AB - Community nurses have been recognized as having a key role in the protection and care of children, particularly in relation to the identification and detection of child abuse. In order to fulfill this role in a competent manner, they need to have access to appropriate supervision. The aim of this paper is to explore community nurses' and health care managers' understanding and experience of clinical supervision in child protection. The findings presented here were collected as part of a larger study commissioned by the Greater Glasgow Primary Health Care National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Ninety-nine nurses and nursing managers were interviewed, either individually or in groups, about their professional involvement in child protection issues and support for their involvement in child protection work, as well as their current knowledge and perceived training needs. The interview data was subjected to a thematic analysis. A lack of consensus was found among nurses and managers in Glasgow as to what constitutes clinical supervision and a good deal of variation in nurses' experiences of clinical supervision in the field of child protection. The historical difficulties with regard to supervision were attributed to several aspects of nursing culture. However, both nurses and managers emphasized the need for formal, regular, systematic supervision for all nurses regardless of their specific role with regard to child protection.

    KW - child protection

    KW - community nursing

    KW - health visiting

    KW - clinical supervision

    U2 - 10.1002/car.873

    DO - 10.1002/car.873

    M3 - Article

    VL - 14

    SP - 57

    EP - 72

    JO - Child Abuse Review

    T2 - Child Abuse Review

    JF - Child Abuse Review

    SN - 0952-9136

    IS - 1

    ER -