Cleanliness audit of clinical surfaces and equipment: who cleans what?

R E Anderson, V Young, M Stewart, Christopher Robertson, S J Dancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current guidelines recommend regular cleaning of clinical equipment. We monitored items on a surgical ward for predominant user, hand-touch frequency, cleaning responsibilities and measurement of organic soil. Equipment was assessed in triplicate against a cleanliness benchmark of 100 relative light units (RLU) using the Hygiena® ATP system. There were 44 items, of which 21 were cleaned by clinical support workers (CSWs), five by domestic staff; three by nurses, three by doctors, and 12 with no designated cleaning responsibility. Geometric mean RLUs ranged from 60 to 550/100 cm² for small items such as hand-gel containers, bed control, blood pressure cuff and clinical notes; with similar values of 80-540/100 cm² RLU for larger items such as electrocardiogram machine, defibrillator, trolleys and tables. Overall geometric mean was 249/100 cm² RLU for all surfaces, with 84% (37 of 44) items exceeding the 100RLU benchmark. Of 27 items cleaned by clinical staff, 24 (89%) failed the benchmark. Of 12 sites with no cleaning specification, 11 (92%) failed the benchmark. Three of seven 'clean' sites (
LanguageEnglish
Pages178-81
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume78
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Clinical Audit
Benchmarking
Equipment and Supplies
Light
Hand
Defibrillators
Touch
Electrocardiography
Soil
Adenosine Triphosphate
Gels
Nurses
Guidelines
Blood Pressure

Keywords

  • decontamination
  • environmental microbiology
  • equipment and supplies
  • health services research
  • humans
  • quality assurance

Cite this

Anderson, R E ; Young, V ; Stewart, M ; Robertson, Christopher ; Dancer, S J. / Cleanliness audit of clinical surfaces and equipment: who cleans what?. In: Journal of Hospital Infection . 2011 ; Vol. 78, No. 3. pp. 178-81.
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Cleanliness audit of clinical surfaces and equipment: who cleans what? / Anderson, R E; Young, V; Stewart, M; Robertson, Christopher; Dancer, S J.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection , Vol. 78, No. 3, 2011, p. 178-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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