Children's performance on and understanding of the balance scale problem: the effects of adult support

Sharon Philips

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

The present thesis investigated the Vygotskian notion that social influences are necessary for children's learning to take place, and that the process of conceptual development via Representational Redescription, described by Karmiloff-Smith (1992), occurs as a result of contingent scaffolding techniques. The aim of the research detailed in the thesis was to examine the effects of adult support on children's performance on and understanding of a Balance Scale task. Analyses of support focused on the extent to which language used by the adult could be appropriated and used subsequently by the child to complete the task and explain their actions. The adult providing support was either the child's parent (Study 1), or was unknown to the child (Studies 2 and 3). Whereas Studies 1 and 2 focused on the impact of support on individual children, Study 3 looked at this impact on collaborating children working in dyads. All children worked on the Balance Scale task at three separate time-points.
LanguageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • University Of Strathclyde
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2007

Fingerprint

performance
dyad
parents
present
language
learning

Keywords

  • childhood learning
  • balance scale task
  • language
  • teaching

Cite this

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title = "Children's performance on and understanding of the balance scale problem: the effects of adult support",
abstract = "The present thesis investigated the Vygotskian notion that social influences are necessary for children's learning to take place, and that the process of conceptual development via Representational Redescription, described by Karmiloff-Smith (1992), occurs as a result of contingent scaffolding techniques. The aim of the research detailed in the thesis was to examine the effects of adult support on children's performance on and understanding of a Balance Scale task. Analyses of support focused on the extent to which language used by the adult could be appropriated and used subsequently by the child to complete the task and explain their actions. The adult providing support was either the child's parent (Study 1), or was unknown to the child (Studies 2 and 3). Whereas Studies 1 and 2 focused on the impact of support on individual children, Study 3 looked at this impact on collaborating children working in dyads. All children worked on the Balance Scale task at three separate time-points.",
keywords = "childhood learning, balance scale task, language, teaching",
author = "Sharon Philips",
year = "2007",
month = "10",
language = "English",
school = "University Of Strathclyde",

}

Children's performance on and understanding of the balance scale problem: the effects of adult support. / Philips, Sharon.

2007. 307 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - Children's performance on and understanding of the balance scale problem: the effects of adult support

AU - Philips, Sharon

PY - 2007/10

Y1 - 2007/10

N2 - The present thesis investigated the Vygotskian notion that social influences are necessary for children's learning to take place, and that the process of conceptual development via Representational Redescription, described by Karmiloff-Smith (1992), occurs as a result of contingent scaffolding techniques. The aim of the research detailed in the thesis was to examine the effects of adult support on children's performance on and understanding of a Balance Scale task. Analyses of support focused on the extent to which language used by the adult could be appropriated and used subsequently by the child to complete the task and explain their actions. The adult providing support was either the child's parent (Study 1), or was unknown to the child (Studies 2 and 3). Whereas Studies 1 and 2 focused on the impact of support on individual children, Study 3 looked at this impact on collaborating children working in dyads. All children worked on the Balance Scale task at three separate time-points.

AB - The present thesis investigated the Vygotskian notion that social influences are necessary for children's learning to take place, and that the process of conceptual development via Representational Redescription, described by Karmiloff-Smith (1992), occurs as a result of contingent scaffolding techniques. The aim of the research detailed in the thesis was to examine the effects of adult support on children's performance on and understanding of a Balance Scale task. Analyses of support focused on the extent to which language used by the adult could be appropriated and used subsequently by the child to complete the task and explain their actions. The adult providing support was either the child's parent (Study 1), or was unknown to the child (Studies 2 and 3). Whereas Studies 1 and 2 focused on the impact of support on individual children, Study 3 looked at this impact on collaborating children working in dyads. All children worked on the Balance Scale task at three separate time-points.

KW - childhood learning

KW - balance scale task

KW - language

KW - teaching

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -