CHED 309-Functionalized nanoparticles as new tools for bioanalysis

Jacob Berger, Duncan Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Metallic nanoparticles can be used as basic materials for a wide variety of purposes including building blocks for nanoassemblies, substrates for enhanced spectroscopies such as fluorescence and Raman, and as labels for biomolecules. Here we report how silver and gold nanoparticles can be functionalized with specific biomolecular probes to indicate the molecular recognition of a target molecule. Examples of this approach include DNA hybridization to switch on surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) when a specific target sequence is present, recognition of specific proteins by aptamer functionalised nanoparticles through surface plasmon resonance or SERRS, and the use of nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies to provide a new type of immunoassay. These examples indicate how nanoparticles can be used to provide highly sensitive and informative data from a variety of biological systems when used with optical spectroscopy.
LanguageEnglish
Pages-
Number of pages1
JournalAbstracts of papers - American Chemical Society
Volume238
Publication statusPublished - 16 Aug 2009

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Nanoparticles
Raman scattering
Molecular recognition
Surface plasmon resonance
Biomolecules
Biological systems
Silver
Antibodies
Gold
Labels
DNA
Fluorescence
Switches
Spectroscopy
Proteins
Molecules
Substrates

Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • bioanalysis

Cite this

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CHED 309-Functionalized nanoparticles as new tools for bioanalysis. / Berger, Jacob; Graham, Duncan.

In: Abstracts of papers - American Chemical Society, Vol. 238, 16.08.2009, p. -.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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