Cell phoney: human cloning after Quintavalle

Derek Morgan, Mary Ford

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reproductive cloning has thrown up new scientific possibilities, ethical conundrums, and legal challenges. An initial question, considered by the English courts in 2003, was whether the technique presently available, that of cell nucleus replacement, falls outside the provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. If it does, the creation and use, including use in research protocols, of human embryos would be unregulated, disclosing a need to consider remedial legislation. The resolution by the courts of this legal question dramatically engages them in a resolution of fundamental ethical dilemmas, and discloses the possibilities and limitation of negotiating science policy through the processes of litigation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages524-526
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2004

Fingerprint

Embryo Research
Embryology
Negotiating
Jurisprudence
Cell Nucleus
Legislation
Fertilization
Organism Cloning
embryo
science policy
legislation
act
Cells
Human Cloning

Keywords

  • medical ethics
  • human cloning
  • Quintavalle
  • human fertilisation

Cite this

Morgan, Derek ; Ford, Mary. / Cell phoney : human cloning after Quintavalle. In: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2004 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 524-526.
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Cell phoney : human cloning after Quintavalle. / Morgan, Derek; Ford, Mary.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 30, No. 6, 12.2004, p. 524-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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AU - Ford, Mary

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AB - Reproductive cloning has thrown up new scientific possibilities, ethical conundrums, and legal challenges. An initial question, considered by the English courts in 2003, was whether the technique presently available, that of cell nucleus replacement, falls outside the provisions of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990. If it does, the creation and use, including use in research protocols, of human embryos would be unregulated, disclosing a need to consider remedial legislation. The resolution by the courts of this legal question dramatically engages them in a resolution of fundamental ethical dilemmas, and discloses the possibilities and limitation of negotiating science policy through the processes of litigation.

KW - medical ethics

KW - human cloning

KW - Quintavalle

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M3 - Comment/debate

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SP - 524

EP - 526

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JF - Journal of Medical Ethics

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