CATALISE: a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development. Phase 2. Terminology

Dorothy V.M. Bishop, Margaret J. Snowling, Paul A. Thompson, Trisha Greenhalgh, Elspeth McCartney, CATALISE-2 consortium

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Lack of agreement about criteria and terminology for children’s language problems affects access to services as well as hindering research and practice. We report the second phase of a study using an online Delphi method to address these issues. In the first phase, we focused on criteria for language disorder. Here we consider terminology.
Methods: The Delphi method is an iterative process in which an initial set of statements is rated by a panel of experts, who then have the opportunity to view anonymised ratings from other panel members. On this basis they can either revise their views or make a case for their position. The statements are then revised based on panel feedback, and again rated by and commented on by the panel. In this study, feedback from a second round was used to prepare a final set of statements in narrative form. The panel included 57 individuals representing a range of professions and nationalities.
Results: We achieved at least 78% agreement for 19 of 21 statements within two rounds of ratings. The term ‘Language Disorder’ is recommended to refer to a profile of difficulties that causes functional impairment in everyday life and is associated with poor prognosis. The term, ‘Developmental Language Disorder’ (DLD) was endorsed for use when the language disorder was not associated with a known biomedical aetiology. It was also agreed that (1) presence of risk factors (neurobiological or environmental) does not preclude a diagnosis of DLD, (2) DLD can co-occur with other neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., ADHD), and (3) DLD does not require a mismatch between verbal and nonverbal ability.
Conclusions: This Delphi exercise highlights reasons for disagreements about terminology for language disorders and proposes standard definitions and nomenclature
LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 22 Feb 2017

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Delphi Technique
Language Development Disorders
Language Disorders
Language Development
Terminology
Consensus
Child Language
Aptitude
Ethnic Groups
Exercise
Research

Keywords

  • terminology
  • children's language problems
  • Delphi method
  • language disorders
  • developmental language disorder
  • biomedical aetiology
  • specific language impairment
  • risk factors
  • definitions

Cite this

Bishop, D. V. M., Snowling, M. J., Thompson, P. A., Greenhalgh, T., McCartney, E., & CATALISE-2 consortium (Accepted/In press). CATALISE: a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development. Phase 2. Terminology. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.
Bishop, Dorothy V.M. ; Snowling, Margaret J. ; Thompson, Paul A. ; Greenhalgh, Trisha ; McCartney, Elspeth ; CATALISE-2 consortium. / CATALISE : a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development. Phase 2. Terminology. In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry. 2017.
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abstract = "Background: Lack of agreement about criteria and terminology for children’s language problems affects access to services as well as hindering research and practice. We report the second phase of a study using an online Delphi method to address these issues. In the first phase, we focused on criteria for language disorder. Here we consider terminology.Methods: The Delphi method is an iterative process in which an initial set of statements is rated by a panel of experts, who then have the opportunity to view anonymised ratings from other panel members. On this basis they can either revise their views or make a case for their position. The statements are then revised based on panel feedback, and again rated by and commented on by the panel. In this study, feedback from a second round was used to prepare a final set of statements in narrative form. The panel included 57 individuals representing a range of professions and nationalities.Results: We achieved at least 78{\%} agreement for 19 of 21 statements within two rounds of ratings. The term ‘Language Disorder’ is recommended to refer to a profile of difficulties that causes functional impairment in everyday life and is associated with poor prognosis. The term, ‘Developmental Language Disorder’ (DLD) was endorsed for use when the language disorder was not associated with a known biomedical aetiology. It was also agreed that (1) presence of risk factors (neurobiological or environmental) does not preclude a diagnosis of DLD, (2) DLD can co-occur with other neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., ADHD), and (3) DLD does not require a mismatch between verbal and nonverbal ability.Conclusions: This Delphi exercise highlights reasons for disagreements about terminology for language disorders and proposes standard definitions and nomenclature",
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CATALISE : a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development. Phase 2. Terminology. / Bishop, Dorothy V.M.; Snowling, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul A.; Greenhalgh, Trisha; McCartney, Elspeth; CATALISE-2 consortium.

In: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 22.02.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - CATALISE

T2 - Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry

AU - Bishop, Dorothy V.M.

AU - Snowling, Margaret J.

AU - Thompson, Paul A.

AU - Greenhalgh, Trisha

AU - McCartney, Elspeth

AU - CATALISE-2 consortium

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Bishop, D. V. M., Snowling, M. J., Thompson, P. A., Greenhalgh, T., McCartney, E., & CATALISE-2 consortium (2017). CATALISE: a multinational and multidisciplinary Delphi consensus study of problems with language development. Phase 2. Terminology. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

PY - 2017/2/22

Y1 - 2017/2/22

N2 - Background: Lack of agreement about criteria and terminology for children’s language problems affects access to services as well as hindering research and practice. We report the second phase of a study using an online Delphi method to address these issues. In the first phase, we focused on criteria for language disorder. Here we consider terminology.Methods: The Delphi method is an iterative process in which an initial set of statements is rated by a panel of experts, who then have the opportunity to view anonymised ratings from other panel members. On this basis they can either revise their views or make a case for their position. The statements are then revised based on panel feedback, and again rated by and commented on by the panel. In this study, feedback from a second round was used to prepare a final set of statements in narrative form. The panel included 57 individuals representing a range of professions and nationalities.Results: We achieved at least 78% agreement for 19 of 21 statements within two rounds of ratings. The term ‘Language Disorder’ is recommended to refer to a profile of difficulties that causes functional impairment in everyday life and is associated with poor prognosis. The term, ‘Developmental Language Disorder’ (DLD) was endorsed for use when the language disorder was not associated with a known biomedical aetiology. It was also agreed that (1) presence of risk factors (neurobiological or environmental) does not preclude a diagnosis of DLD, (2) DLD can co-occur with other neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g., ADHD), and (3) DLD does not require a mismatch between verbal and nonverbal ability.Conclusions: This Delphi exercise highlights reasons for disagreements about terminology for language disorders and proposes standard definitions and nomenclature

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KW - terminology

KW - children's language problems

KW - Delphi method

KW - language disorders

KW - developmental language disorder

KW - biomedical aetiology

KW - specific language impairment

KW - risk factors

KW - definitions

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