Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

Abstract

Previous research has shown that increased efficiency in the use of energy triggers price and income effects that result in productivity- or demand-led economic growth processes (depending on whether efficiency improves on the production or consumption side of the economy) but which are accompanied by a rebound in energy use at the economy-wide level, partially offsetting expected energy savings in the more efficiency activity. The question we set out to address here is whether economy-wide rebound effects can be reduced without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits. We take the example of increased energy efficiency in the provision of public and freight transport and use a multi-sector CGE model to examine the impacts on household fuel use in personal transportation, where this is a competing, and relatively energy-intensive competitor for the more efficient public/freight provision. Our key finding is that by varying just one parameter in the model – the elasticity that governs household substitution between personal and the more public/freight transport as the relative price changes – we get marked variation in the magnitude of the economy-wide rebound effect with negligible (if any) impact on key macroeconomic impacts.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium
Subtitle of host publicationEconomic and Social Research Institute linked seminar
Place of PublicationDublin
Pages12
Number of pages1
Publication statusUnpublished - 2015
EventUniversity College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium 2015 - Dublin, Ireland
Duration: 23 Nov 201524 Mar 2016

Conference

ConferenceUniversity College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium 2015
CountryIreland
CityDublin
Period23/11/1524/03/16

Fingerprint

Energy efficiency
Elasticity
Energy conservation
Substitution reactions
Lead
Productivity
Economics
Freight transport
Rebound
Macroeconomics
Household
Rebound effect
Energy

Keywords

  • efficiency
  • energy
  • economic growth
  • computable general equilibrium
  • rebound effects
  • household fuel use
  • transportation
  • piblic transport
  • freight
  • macroeconomic impacts

Cite this

Turner, K. (2015). Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport?. Unpublished In The University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium : Economic and Social Research Institute linked seminar (pp. 12). Dublin.
Turner, Karen. / Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport?. The University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium : Economic and Social Research Institute linked seminar. Dublin, 2015. pp. 12
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title = "Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport?",
abstract = "Previous research has shown that increased efficiency in the use of energy triggers price and income effects that result in productivity- or demand-led economic growth processes (depending on whether efficiency improves on the production or consumption side of the economy) but which are accompanied by a rebound in energy use at the economy-wide level, partially offsetting expected energy savings in the more efficiency activity. The question we set out to address here is whether economy-wide rebound effects can be reduced without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits. We take the example of increased energy efficiency in the provision of public and freight transport and use a multi-sector CGE model to examine the impacts on household fuel use in personal transportation, where this is a competing, and relatively energy-intensive competitor for the more efficient public/freight provision. Our key finding is that by varying just one parameter in the model – the elasticity that governs household substitution between personal and the more public/freight transport as the relative price changes – we get marked variation in the magnitude of the economy-wide rebound effect with negligible (if any) impact on key macroeconomic impacts.",
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Turner, K 2015, Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport? in The University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium : Economic and Social Research Institute linked seminar. Dublin, pp. 12, University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium 2015, Dublin, Ireland, 23/11/15.

Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport? / Turner, Karen.

The University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium : Economic and Social Research Institute linked seminar. Dublin, 2015. p. 12.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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T1 - Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport?

AU - Turner, Karen

PY - 2015

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N2 - Previous research has shown that increased efficiency in the use of energy triggers price and income effects that result in productivity- or demand-led economic growth processes (depending on whether efficiency improves on the production or consumption side of the economy) but which are accompanied by a rebound in energy use at the economy-wide level, partially offsetting expected energy savings in the more efficiency activity. The question we set out to address here is whether economy-wide rebound effects can be reduced without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits. We take the example of increased energy efficiency in the provision of public and freight transport and use a multi-sector CGE model to examine the impacts on household fuel use in personal transportation, where this is a competing, and relatively energy-intensive competitor for the more efficient public/freight provision. Our key finding is that by varying just one parameter in the model – the elasticity that governs household substitution between personal and the more public/freight transport as the relative price changes – we get marked variation in the magnitude of the economy-wide rebound effect with negligible (if any) impact on key macroeconomic impacts.

AB - Previous research has shown that increased efficiency in the use of energy triggers price and income effects that result in productivity- or demand-led economic growth processes (depending on whether efficiency improves on the production or consumption side of the economy) but which are accompanied by a rebound in energy use at the economy-wide level, partially offsetting expected energy savings in the more efficiency activity. The question we set out to address here is whether economy-wide rebound effects can be reduced without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits. We take the example of increased energy efficiency in the provision of public and freight transport and use a multi-sector CGE model to examine the impacts on household fuel use in personal transportation, where this is a competing, and relatively energy-intensive competitor for the more efficient public/freight provision. Our key finding is that by varying just one parameter in the model – the elasticity that governs household substitution between personal and the more public/freight transport as the relative price changes – we get marked variation in the magnitude of the economy-wide rebound effect with negligible (if any) impact on key macroeconomic impacts.

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KW - economic growth

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KW - rebound effects

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Turner K. Can we reduce rebound without sacrificing macroeconomic benefits of increased energy efficiency in public/freight transport? In The University College Dublin Energy Institute and Electricity Research Centre Annual Symposium : Economic and Social Research Institute linked seminar. Dublin. 2015. p. 12