Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy?

Richard Lord, Douglas Bertram, Neil Cochrane, Alasdair Hamilton, Ignas Jakstys, Elsa Joao, Peter Robinson, Keith Torrance

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

The vision of a circular economy is to limit environmental damage through waste elimination. This is only possible through intensive recycling and the elimination of waste streams via beneficial reuse, with a corresponding reduction in the estimated 10.7 Mg CO2 emissions per capita in Scotland (Pratt, Lenaghan et al. 2016). Sediments dredged from Scotland’s four operating canals represent a waste stream that can be potentially utilized, providing its geotechnical properties can be optimised and any residual environmental concerns, such as sediment contamination, can be addressed. Scottish Canals currently remove around 4,000 tonnes of material per year to maintain canal depth and navigability through the canal network. Over 99% of EU marine sediment is dumped at sea, representing a lost opportunity to reuse or recycle materials for use in engineering works to prevent flood risk or erosion under climate change scenarios.

Conference

ConferenceSociety for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) Annual Conference
Abbreviated titleSEGH-19
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityManchester
Period1/07/194/07/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Canals
Sediments
Climate change
Recycling
Erosion
Contamination

Keywords

  • canal sediments
  • Scotland
  • beneficial reuse

Cite this

Lord, R., Bertram, D., Cochrane, N., Hamilton, A., Jakstys, I., Joao, E., ... Torrance, K. (2019). Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy?. Poster session presented at Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) Annual Conference, Manchester, United Kingdom.
Lord, Richard ; Bertram, Douglas ; Cochrane, Neil ; Hamilton, Alasdair ; Jakstys, Ignas ; Joao, Elsa ; Robinson, Peter ; Torrance, Keith. / Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy?. Poster session presented at Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) Annual Conference, Manchester, United Kingdom.
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abstract = "The vision of a circular economy is to limit environmental damage through waste elimination. This is only possible through intensive recycling and the elimination of waste streams via beneficial reuse, with a corresponding reduction in the estimated 10.7 Mg CO2 emissions per capita in Scotland (Pratt, Lenaghan et al. 2016). Sediments dredged from Scotland’s four operating canals represent a waste stream that can be potentially utilized, providing its geotechnical properties can be optimised and any residual environmental concerns, such as sediment contamination, can be addressed. Scottish Canals currently remove around 4,000 tonnes of material per year to maintain canal depth and navigability through the canal network. Over 99{\%} of EU marine sediment is dumped at sea, representing a lost opportunity to reuse or recycle materials for use in engineering works to prevent flood risk or erosion under climate change scenarios.",
keywords = "canal sediments, Scotland, beneficial reuse",
author = "Richard Lord and Douglas Bertram and Neil Cochrane and Alasdair Hamilton and Ignas Jakstys and Elsa Joao and Peter Robinson and Keith Torrance",
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Lord, R, Bertram, D, Cochrane, N, Hamilton, A, Jakstys, I, Joao, E, Robinson, P & Torrance, K 2019, 'Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy?' Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) Annual Conference, Manchester, United Kingdom, 1/07/19 - 4/07/19, .

Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy? / Lord, Richard; Bertram, Douglas; Cochrane, Neil; Hamilton, Alasdair; Jakstys, Ignas; Joao, Elsa; Robinson, Peter; Torrance, Keith.

2019. Poster session presented at Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) Annual Conference, Manchester, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy?

AU - Lord, Richard

AU - Bertram, Douglas

AU - Cochrane, Neil

AU - Hamilton, Alasdair

AU - Jakstys, Ignas

AU - Joao, Elsa

AU - Robinson, Peter

AU - Torrance, Keith

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - The vision of a circular economy is to limit environmental damage through waste elimination. This is only possible through intensive recycling and the elimination of waste streams via beneficial reuse, with a corresponding reduction in the estimated 10.7 Mg CO2 emissions per capita in Scotland (Pratt, Lenaghan et al. 2016). Sediments dredged from Scotland’s four operating canals represent a waste stream that can be potentially utilized, providing its geotechnical properties can be optimised and any residual environmental concerns, such as sediment contamination, can be addressed. Scottish Canals currently remove around 4,000 tonnes of material per year to maintain canal depth and navigability through the canal network. Over 99% of EU marine sediment is dumped at sea, representing a lost opportunity to reuse or recycle materials for use in engineering works to prevent flood risk or erosion under climate change scenarios.

AB - The vision of a circular economy is to limit environmental damage through waste elimination. This is only possible through intensive recycling and the elimination of waste streams via beneficial reuse, with a corresponding reduction in the estimated 10.7 Mg CO2 emissions per capita in Scotland (Pratt, Lenaghan et al. 2016). Sediments dredged from Scotland’s four operating canals represent a waste stream that can be potentially utilized, providing its geotechnical properties can be optimised and any residual environmental concerns, such as sediment contamination, can be addressed. Scottish Canals currently remove around 4,000 tonnes of material per year to maintain canal depth and navigability through the canal network. Over 99% of EU marine sediment is dumped at sea, representing a lost opportunity to reuse or recycle materials for use in engineering works to prevent flood risk or erosion under climate change scenarios.

KW - canal sediments

KW - Scotland

KW - beneficial reuse

UR - https://www2.mmu.ac.uk/segh-19/

M3 - Poster

ER -

Lord R, Bertram D, Cochrane N, Hamilton A, Jakstys I, Joao E et al. Can dredged canal sediments be used for flood defences as part of the Scottish circular economy?. 2019. Poster session presented at Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health (SEGH) Annual Conference, Manchester, United Kingdom.