Can CCO theory tell us how organizing is distinct from markets, networking, belonging to a community, or supporting a social movement?

J. Sillince

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    McPhee and Zaug (2009) advanced a theory that organizations are constituted by the four communication processes of membership negotiation, organizational self-structuring, activity coordination, and institutional positioning. My argument here is that in order to say what organizational constitution entails, we must consider what is distinctive about an organization as compared with any other collective. Examples of other types of collectives include markets such as car sales, networks such as walking enthusiasts who communicate with each other, communities such as cities, and social movements such as gay rights. A theory of communication as constitutive of organizing (CCO; see Putnam & Nicotera, 2009, the subject of this forum) must, in my view, be able to show how organizations are formed and maintained rather than say markets or networks. I use and extend the same logic as McPhee and Zaug use when they argue how groups of friends are not an organization. My argument is that McPhee and Zaug's model can also apply to these other collective forms and thus that it is insufficiently organizational.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages132-138
    Number of pages6
    JournalManagement Communication Quarterly
    Volume24
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Fingerprint

    social movement
    networking
    organization
    organization theory
    communication
    market
    Social Movements
    community
    sales
    constitution
    Communication
    Sales
    Railroad cars
    Group
    Organizing
    Social movements
    Networking
    Car
    Communication processes
    Logic

    Keywords

    • organization
    • markets
    • networking
    • community
    • social movement
    • management

    Cite this

    @article{9dc00410e8864bfba78900d572296b4e,
    title = "Can CCO theory tell us how organizing is distinct from markets, networking, belonging to a community, or supporting a social movement?",
    abstract = "McPhee and Zaug (2009) advanced a theory that organizations are constituted by the four communication processes of membership negotiation, organizational self-structuring, activity coordination, and institutional positioning. My argument here is that in order to say what organizational constitution entails, we must consider what is distinctive about an organization as compared with any other collective. Examples of other types of collectives include markets such as car sales, networks such as walking enthusiasts who communicate with each other, communities such as cities, and social movements such as gay rights. A theory of communication as constitutive of organizing (CCO; see Putnam & Nicotera, 2009, the subject of this forum) must, in my view, be able to show how organizations are formed and maintained rather than say markets or networks. I use and extend the same logic as McPhee and Zaug use when they argue how groups of friends are not an organization. My argument is that McPhee and Zaug's model can also apply to these other collective forms and thus that it is insufficiently organizational.",
    keywords = "organization, markets, networking, community, social movement, management",
    author = "J. Sillince",
    year = "2010",
    doi = "10.1177/089331890352022",
    language = "English",
    volume = "24",
    pages = "132--138",
    journal = "Management Communication Quarterly",
    issn = "0893-3189",
    number = "1",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Can CCO theory tell us how organizing is distinct from markets, networking, belonging to a community, or supporting a social movement?

    AU - Sillince, J.

    PY - 2010

    Y1 - 2010

    N2 - McPhee and Zaug (2009) advanced a theory that organizations are constituted by the four communication processes of membership negotiation, organizational self-structuring, activity coordination, and institutional positioning. My argument here is that in order to say what organizational constitution entails, we must consider what is distinctive about an organization as compared with any other collective. Examples of other types of collectives include markets such as car sales, networks such as walking enthusiasts who communicate with each other, communities such as cities, and social movements such as gay rights. A theory of communication as constitutive of organizing (CCO; see Putnam & Nicotera, 2009, the subject of this forum) must, in my view, be able to show how organizations are formed and maintained rather than say markets or networks. I use and extend the same logic as McPhee and Zaug use when they argue how groups of friends are not an organization. My argument is that McPhee and Zaug's model can also apply to these other collective forms and thus that it is insufficiently organizational.

    AB - McPhee and Zaug (2009) advanced a theory that organizations are constituted by the four communication processes of membership negotiation, organizational self-structuring, activity coordination, and institutional positioning. My argument here is that in order to say what organizational constitution entails, we must consider what is distinctive about an organization as compared with any other collective. Examples of other types of collectives include markets such as car sales, networks such as walking enthusiasts who communicate with each other, communities such as cities, and social movements such as gay rights. A theory of communication as constitutive of organizing (CCO; see Putnam & Nicotera, 2009, the subject of this forum) must, in my view, be able to show how organizations are formed and maintained rather than say markets or networks. I use and extend the same logic as McPhee and Zaug use when they argue how groups of friends are not an organization. My argument is that McPhee and Zaug's model can also apply to these other collective forms and thus that it is insufficiently organizational.

    KW - organization

    KW - markets

    KW - networking

    KW - community

    KW - social movement

    KW - management

    UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/089331890352022

    U2 - 10.1177/089331890352022

    DO - 10.1177/089331890352022

    M3 - Article

    VL - 24

    SP - 132

    EP - 138

    JO - Management Communication Quarterly

    T2 - Management Communication Quarterly

    JF - Management Communication Quarterly

    SN - 0893-3189

    IS - 1

    ER -