Caesarean section surgical site infection surveillance

A. Johnson, D. Young, J. Reilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

100 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) is an important infection control activity. The Caesarean section procedure was selected, as part of the Scottish Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infection Programme, to monitor and report upon the incidence of SSI. Data were collected prospectively for 715 patients undergoing a Caesarean section procedure for 35 weeks during the latter months of 2002 and the first quarter of 2003. Of these, 80 (11.2%) patients developed an SSI, 57 (71%) of which were detected by postdischarge surveillance. Risk factors associated with infection were analysed. The choice of subcuticular suture rather than staples to close the surgical site was associated with a significantly lower incidence of infection (P = 0.021). Obese women experienced significantly more infections than women with a normal body mass index (P = 0.028). Dissemination of the surveillance results has made clinicians aware of the influence of body mass index and choice of skin closure in relation to SSI in this patient population. Analysis of these data has led to a review of local practice. The results also indicate the importance of postdischarge surveillance if SSIs are to be detected in this patient group. Continuous data collection and timely dissemination of the results are important factors acting as the catalyst for a review of practice.

LanguageEnglish
Pages30-35
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Volume64
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

Fingerprint

Surgical Wound Infection
Cesarean Section
Body Mass Index
Infection
Incidence
Infection Control
Cross Infection
Sutures
Skin
Population

Keywords

  • caesarean section
  • surgical site infection
  • surveillance

Cite this

@article{265441b7e3ee42408db4994f5ab32dac,
title = "Caesarean section surgical site infection surveillance",
abstract = "Surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) is an important infection control activity. The Caesarean section procedure was selected, as part of the Scottish Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infection Programme, to monitor and report upon the incidence of SSI. Data were collected prospectively for 715 patients undergoing a Caesarean section procedure for 35 weeks during the latter months of 2002 and the first quarter of 2003. Of these, 80 (11.2{\%}) patients developed an SSI, 57 (71{\%}) of which were detected by postdischarge surveillance. Risk factors associated with infection were analysed. The choice of subcuticular suture rather than staples to close the surgical site was associated with a significantly lower incidence of infection (P = 0.021). Obese women experienced significantly more infections than women with a normal body mass index (P = 0.028). Dissemination of the surveillance results has made clinicians aware of the influence of body mass index and choice of skin closure in relation to SSI in this patient population. Analysis of these data has led to a review of local practice. The results also indicate the importance of postdischarge surveillance if SSIs are to be detected in this patient group. Continuous data collection and timely dissemination of the results are important factors acting as the catalyst for a review of practice.",
keywords = "caesarean section, surgical site infection, surveillance",
author = "A. Johnson and D. Young and J. Reilly",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhin.2006.03.020",
language = "English",
volume = "64",
pages = "30--35",
journal = "Journal of Hospital Infection",
issn = "0195-6701",
number = "1",

}

Caesarean section surgical site infection surveillance. / Johnson, A.; Young, D.; Reilly, J.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection , Vol. 64, No. 1, 09.2006, p. 30-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Caesarean section surgical site infection surveillance

AU - Johnson, A.

AU - Young, D.

AU - Reilly, J.

PY - 2006/9

Y1 - 2006/9

N2 - Surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) is an important infection control activity. The Caesarean section procedure was selected, as part of the Scottish Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infection Programme, to monitor and report upon the incidence of SSI. Data were collected prospectively for 715 patients undergoing a Caesarean section procedure for 35 weeks during the latter months of 2002 and the first quarter of 2003. Of these, 80 (11.2%) patients developed an SSI, 57 (71%) of which were detected by postdischarge surveillance. Risk factors associated with infection were analysed. The choice of subcuticular suture rather than staples to close the surgical site was associated with a significantly lower incidence of infection (P = 0.021). Obese women experienced significantly more infections than women with a normal body mass index (P = 0.028). Dissemination of the surveillance results has made clinicians aware of the influence of body mass index and choice of skin closure in relation to SSI in this patient population. Analysis of these data has led to a review of local practice. The results also indicate the importance of postdischarge surveillance if SSIs are to be detected in this patient group. Continuous data collection and timely dissemination of the results are important factors acting as the catalyst for a review of practice.

AB - Surveillance of surgical site infection (SSI) is an important infection control activity. The Caesarean section procedure was selected, as part of the Scottish Surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infection Programme, to monitor and report upon the incidence of SSI. Data were collected prospectively for 715 patients undergoing a Caesarean section procedure for 35 weeks during the latter months of 2002 and the first quarter of 2003. Of these, 80 (11.2%) patients developed an SSI, 57 (71%) of which were detected by postdischarge surveillance. Risk factors associated with infection were analysed. The choice of subcuticular suture rather than staples to close the surgical site was associated with a significantly lower incidence of infection (P = 0.021). Obese women experienced significantly more infections than women with a normal body mass index (P = 0.028). Dissemination of the surveillance results has made clinicians aware of the influence of body mass index and choice of skin closure in relation to SSI in this patient population. Analysis of these data has led to a review of local practice. The results also indicate the importance of postdischarge surveillance if SSIs are to be detected in this patient group. Continuous data collection and timely dissemination of the results are important factors acting as the catalyst for a review of practice.

KW - caesarean section

KW - surgical site infection

KW - surveillance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33746700129&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195670106002131

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhin.2006.03.020

DO - 10.1016/j.jhin.2006.03.020

M3 - Article

VL - 64

SP - 30

EP - 35

JO - Journal of Hospital Infection

T2 - Journal of Hospital Infection

JF - Journal of Hospital Infection

SN - 0195-6701

IS - 1

ER -