Business investment performance in Scotland

Kenny Richmond, Jennifer Turnbull, Graeme Roy (Editor)

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Business investment (including spending on machinery, buildings, ICT, R&D) is a key driver of productivity. New data shows that Scotland’s business investment rate has been lower than nearly all other OECD countries for a number of years, resulting in a low level of capital stock per worker. Scotland’s low business investment is likely due to a number of factors, including: industrial structure: a small manufacturing sector and larger public sector; weak business R&D expenditure; low levels of competition, reducing the incentives to invest: management short-termism in some companies; low productivity reducing potential returns from investment; and, low wage growth reducing the cost of labour relative to capital. Business investment by Scottish-owned companies appears to be particularly low. Low business investment is likely a major reason for Scotland’s low productivity levels and growth.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages82-93
    Number of pages12
    JournalFraser of Allander Economic Commentary
    Volume41
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2017

    Fingerprint

    Business investment
    Investment performance
    Scotland
    Productivity
    Manufacturing sector
    Labor
    Workers
    Capital stock
    Incentives
    Factors
    Expenditure
    Public sector
    Costs
    Short-termism
    Machinery
    OECD countries
    Industrial structure
    Wage growth

    Keywords

    • business investment
    • productivity
    • productivity growth
    • productivity measurement

    Cite this

    Richmond, Kenny ; Turnbull, Jennifer ; Roy, Graeme (Editor). / Business investment performance in Scotland. In: Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary. 2017 ; Vol. 41, No. 1. pp. 82-93.
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    Business investment performance in Scotland. / Richmond, Kenny; Turnbull, Jennifer; Roy, Graeme (Editor).

    In: Fraser of Allander Economic Commentary, Vol. 41, No. 1, 22.03.2017, p. 82-93.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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