Britain's real foreign policy and the failure of British academia

Mark Curtis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article argues that the reality of Britain's foreign policy is very different than usually presented by academics. In most analyses within the 'mainstream', the goals espoused by policy-makers themselves are generally taken seriously and tend to set the framework of academic analysis. This means that criticism is usually within very narrow parameters and regularly ignores whole policies. Curtis argues that British academics have categorically failed to document rigorously the formerly secret planning records in the National Archives. He reveals from his research the secret record of British policy in a number of countries, including Iran, Kenya and Indonesia before considering foreign policy under Blair. He argues that Britain is a systematic violator of international law and a persistent condoner of human rights abuses.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages275-287
    Number of pages13
    JournalInternational Relations
    Volume18
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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    foreign policy
    international law
    Kenya
    Iran
    Indonesia
    human rights
    criticism
    abuse
    planning

    Keywords

    • Blair
    • Britain
    • Diego Garcia
    • foreign policy
    • Indonesia
    • Iran
    • Kenya
    • Malaya
    • Russia
    • Rwanda
    • international law
    • academia

    Cite this

    Curtis, Mark. / Britain's real foreign policy and the failure of British academia. In: International Relations. 2004 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 275-287.
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    Britain's real foreign policy and the failure of British academia. / Curtis, Mark.

    In: International Relations, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2004, p. 275-287.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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