Brief report: imitation of meaningless gestures in individuals with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism

Heidi Stieglitz Ham, Martin Corley, Gnanathusharan Rajendran, Jean Carletta, Sara Swanson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nineteen people with Asperger syndrome (AS)/High-Functioning Autism (HFA) (ages 7-15) were tested on imitation of two types of meaningless gesture: hand postures and finger positions. The individuals with AS/HFA achieved lower scores in the imitation of both hand and finger positions relative to a matched neurotypical group. The between-group difference was primarily accounted for by performance on a test of visual motor integration, together with a hand imitation deficit which was specifically due to errors in body part orientation. Our findings implicate both visuomotor processes (Damasio and Maurer, 1978) and self-other mapping (Rogers and Pennington, 1991) in ASD imitation deficits. Following Goldenberg (1999), we propose that difficulties with body part orientation may underlie problems in meaningless gesture imitation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages569-573
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Asperger Syndrome
Gestures
Autistic Disorder
Hand
Human Body
Fingers
Posture
Research Design

Keywords

  • utism spectrum disorder
  • autism
  • asperger syndrome
  • imitation
  • meaningless gestures

Cite this

Stieglitz Ham, Heidi ; Corley, Martin ; Rajendran, Gnanathusharan ; Carletta, Jean ; Swanson, Sara. / Brief report : imitation of meaningless gestures in individuals with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism. In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2008 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 569-573.
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Brief report : imitation of meaningless gestures in individuals with Asperger syndrome and high-functioning autism. / Stieglitz Ham, Heidi; Corley, Martin; Rajendran, Gnanathusharan; Carletta, Jean; Swanson, Sara.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 38, No. 3, 03.2008, p. 569-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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