Book review: Muslim Fashion : Contemporary Style Cultures by Reina Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

Abstract

Reina Lewis examines Muslim women’s hijab (i.e., veiling) as ‘fashion’, a phenomenon that prevails in the contemporary global consumer culture. Her central argument is that the over-politicization of hijab, particularly in the West, has deterred not only the public but also academics from understanding a plethora of dynamics that both influence and are influenced by hijab as fashion. While this overlook is largely related to the post-9/11 signification of hijab as Islamism, Lewis holds Orientalism equally accountable for the underrepresentation of hijab in the fashion discourse. As the author argues, traditionally, fashion has been associated with Western modernity, assuming no place for fashion among Muslims and confining hijab to ethnicity and religiosity. Following the recent rise of Islam’s visibility in the West, hijab has been largely viewed as exclusion from and/or opposition to a progressive modernity, manifested in the West-centric consumer culture.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-3
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Consumer Culture
DOIs
StatePublished - 22 Nov 2017

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Islam
book review
Muslim
modernity
islamism
orientalism
politicization
opposition
exclusion
ethnicity
Muslims
Hijab
discourse
Modernity
Consumer culture

Keywords

  • hijab
  • Muslim fashion
  • consumer culture
  • multiculturalism

Cite this

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title = "Book review: Muslim Fashion : Contemporary Style Cultures by Reina Lewis",
abstract = "Reina Lewis examines Muslim women’s hijab (i.e., veiling) as ‘fashion’, a phenomenon that prevails in the contemporary global consumer culture. Her central argument is that the over-politicization of hijab, particularly in the West, has deterred not only the public but also academics from understanding a plethora of dynamics that both influence and are influenced by hijab as fashion. While this overlook is largely related to the post-9/11 signification of hijab as Islamism, Lewis holds Orientalism equally accountable for the underrepresentation of hijab in the fashion discourse. As the author argues, traditionally, fashion has been associated with Western modernity, assuming no place for fashion among Muslims and confining hijab to ethnicity and religiosity. Following the recent rise of Islam’s visibility in the West, hijab has been largely viewed as exclusion from and/or opposition to a progressive modernity, manifested in the West-centric consumer culture.",
keywords = "hijab, Muslim fashion, consumer culture, multiculturalism",
author = "Aliakbar Jafari",
note = "Published online first on 22 November 2017",
year = "2017",
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doi = "10.1177/1469540517743367",
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}

Book review : Muslim Fashion : Contemporary Style Cultures by Reina Lewis. / Jafari, Aliakbar.

In: Journal of Consumer Culture, 22.11.2017, p. 1-3.

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

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AB - Reina Lewis examines Muslim women’s hijab (i.e., veiling) as ‘fashion’, a phenomenon that prevails in the contemporary global consumer culture. Her central argument is that the over-politicization of hijab, particularly in the West, has deterred not only the public but also academics from understanding a plethora of dynamics that both influence and are influenced by hijab as fashion. While this overlook is largely related to the post-9/11 signification of hijab as Islamism, Lewis holds Orientalism equally accountable for the underrepresentation of hijab in the fashion discourse. As the author argues, traditionally, fashion has been associated with Western modernity, assuming no place for fashion among Muslims and confining hijab to ethnicity and religiosity. Following the recent rise of Islam’s visibility in the West, hijab has been largely viewed as exclusion from and/or opposition to a progressive modernity, manifested in the West-centric consumer culture.

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